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Supreme Court says it won't hear appeal in deadly B.C. ferry sinking

Karl Lilgert, navigator of the Queen of the North, leaves the law courts in Vancouver on May 13, 2013 after being found guilty of criminal negligence causing the deaths of two passengers in the 2006 BC Ferries sinking. The justices have dismissed Karl-Heinz Arthur Lilgert's request to appeal his convictions on two counts of criminal negligence causing death.
Image Credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
May 14, 2015 - 11:27 AM

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear an appeal in the case of a deadly British Columbia ferry sinking in 2006.

The justices have dismissed Karl-Heinz Arthur Lilgert's request to appeal his convictions on two counts of criminal negligence causing death.

Lilgert was the officer of the watch in charge of navigation on the ferry Queen of the North when it ran aground and sank off Gil Island during a voyage to Port Hardy from Prince Rupert.

Two passengers, Gerald Foisy and Shirley Rosette, died in the sinking.

Lilgert was convicted in 2013 and sentenced to four years.

As usual, the justices gave no reasons for not hearing the appeal.

Lilgert's trial was told the ferry's route required a turn which was not carried out. Instead, it followed a straight course at high speed towards the island.

Lilgert testified that he delayed turning and then made course changes in response to the circumstances at the time, including weather and the presence of another boat. He said he was shocked to encounter the island.

The British Columbia Court of Appeal dismissed his appeal.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2015
The Canadian Press

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