Top News
  • Port Hardy earthquake felt across Okanagan

    KELOWNA - A series of earthquakes 90km south of Port Hardy has several Twitter users saying they felt it here in the Okanagan as well.

    According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the first quake hit at 8:10 p.m. and registered 6.7. A second 5.0 quake struck the same area seven minutes later followed by a 4.3 at 8:40 p.m.

    Several Tweet's were sent by Okanagan residents saying they felt the earthquake in Kelowna, Kamloops and Vernon, however this has not been confirmed.

    There are no reports of damage or injuries. Information will be updated as it becomes available.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

  • You dirty rat: almost 80 dead rodents found in southern Alberta landfill

    MEDICINE HAT, Alta. - Another 78 dead rats have been pulled from a southern Alberta landfill that has been plagued by the pests.

    The City of Medicine Hat is working to get rid of the rodents and is providing a weekly update.

    Last week, 63 dead rats were discovered and the week before there were 39.

    Jason Storch, an agricultural fieldman with Cypress County, says he can't put a timeline on the situation.

    The rats were spotted at the dump earlier this month after someone reported finding one in a farmyard.

    Alberta has always prided itself on being rat free, but that status has been in question since August 2012 when the vermin were first found in the landfill.

    At least 100 Norway rats were killed by city workers after an 80- metre-long nest was discovered. It took six hours for 21 workers and two excavators to dismantle it.

    The landfill has been continuously monitored since then and the city credits that vigilance for discovering the new cases. City officials said earlier this month that more poison was being put out and that staff would check bait stations daily.

    Agricultural fieldmen known by Albertans as the "rat patrol'' have worked for years to target invading rats in a control zone along the province's eastern boundary.

  • Make room for summer clothes at the first ever Closet Cleanout flea market

    KELOWNA – If the warmer weather has you thinking of upgrading your summer wardrobe, then this weekend event may be just what you’re looking for.

    The first ever Kelowna Closet Cleanout is hosting a women’s wear flea market this Saturday, featuring more than 70 booths of women’s clothing and footwear.

    Rosanne Ting-Mak Brown is the organizer and says she got the idea after attending a kid’s clothes flea market.

    “I said to my husband ‘why doesn’t anyone do this for women?’” she says.

    Although the booths sold out two weeks ago, Brown says that only means there will be plenty of stock for shoppers to choose from.

    “We’ll have everything from women’s clothes and accessories to footwear and a few other things as well. Most of the tables are individual sellers,” Brown says. “But we also have a lot of consignment stores in town excited for the event.”

    All profits as well as some unsold clothing and footwear will be donated to the Kelowna Women’s Shelter and Soles4Souls.

    “The Women’s Shelter has a lot of programs and they’re very local,” she says. “I thought it worked well and they are a deserving charity.”

    The first 200 through the door will receive gift bags and every attendee will be entered for a chance to win one of 20 door prizes donated by local businesses. There will also be a vintage photo booth supplied by Georgie Girl, a local consignment store.

    The Closet Cleanout takes place at the Sunplex Arena Saturday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    “I think it’s going to be a great time, so come on out,” Brown says.

    Admission is $5.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

  • Kelowna grandmother dominates at Boston Marathon

    "THEY WANTED TO BE PART OF A CELEBRATION RATHER THAN A TRAGEDY."

    KELOWNA – When Kelowna grandmother Liz Borrett received her invitation to run in the Boston Marathon for the second year in a row, she says she didn’t even hesitate.

     “I’m so glad I went back,” she says. “It was such a neat experience to share in getting Boston back in charge of the runs.”

    Borrett, 75, not only participated in the iconic marathon that was hit with a homemade bomb last year, she also placed first in the 75-79 age group.

    “I’ve got an advantage over most people because most of them aren’t old enough,” she says with a laugh. “There’s not a whole lot of us running at that age. I understand there were five that entered and three that finished.”

    Borrett, a retired nurse, started running marathons at the relatively late age of 64. She says it was simply a way to stay active and stay in shape, but acknowledges the importance of the social side of running.

    “I tend to be a person who likes to be really busy so I went and got involved in running at a fundraising event,” she says. “I’ve always been involved in some kind of physical activity, be it baseball or volleyball or aerobics. If I hadn’t done this run in Boston I’d be hiking in Turkey with my son and two granddaughters, but I’d already registered when they made their plans.”

    Finishing second in her age group last year, Borrett says her focus this year was to enjoy herself and just try to finish.

    “My goal was to do it under four hours and 30 minutes, but my biggest focus was making sure I finished the run,” she says. “I wasn’t sure how my endurance would hold up because I didn’t get the same amount of training in but it didn’t impact my time. That’s a good time for me.”

    Borrett’s training was interrupted in January when she tripped on a sidewalk during a run and broke her collarbone. The injury prevented her from running for seven weeks.

    “I haven’t got a lot of time to waste,” says Borrett, who finished 30 minutes ahead of the second place with a time of 4 hours and 22 minutes. “It was a good time for me. It was only during the last three kilometres that my head was kind of negative. A positive attitude is a big part of running.”

    Borrett, who has lived in Kelowna for more than 50 years, says she noticed some interesting differences at the marathon this year.

    “During the run there was a bit more socializing this time,” she says. “People were asking where I was from and if I was there last year. It felt good to be there and it was very easy to meet people. It felt like people were reaching out to each other more this year. Everyone was being really supportive and like they wanted to be part of a celebration rather than a tragedy.”

    Borrett’s next challenge will be competing in the New York Marathon in November.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

  • Penticton family with epileptic child wants law allowing her to use medical marijuana

    PENTICTON - When a retired police officer from Summerland left his job after 25 years, he hardly imagined fighting for his little granddaughter to be given marijuana.

    Chris Nuessler, along his wife and Elaine, wants Canada to allow two-year-old Kyla Williams to be given a form of medical marijuana known to prevent seizures resulting from epilepsy.

    The girl's parents, Jared and Courtney Williams, along with the Nuesslers, have been researching medical pot use and speaking with experts to build what they're calling "Kyla's medical team."

    They say Kyla has suffered severe side effects from prescription drugs when she could be helped like other children in the United States.

    A strain of marijuana commonly called Charlotte's Web has been known to help kids in the U.S., but it's illegal in Canada.

    It contains very little THC, which provides the buzz recreational pot users crave, and is mostly made up of CBD, which limits the severity and frequency of seizures.

    Named after a little girl named Charlotte Figi who has epilepsy, the weed has allowed her to develop and enjoy a more normal life.

    In Canada, the only form of legalized medical marijuana is dried, meaning Kyla would have to smoke it.

    Chris Nuessler said his view of marijuana as medicine has radically changed since his policing days.

    "For me it was back to the 1980s and 1990s mindset when I was busting people. I had to do a 180 (degree turn) and start researching this."

    Kyla appeared to be a healthy, little girl for the first six months of her life until her mother noticed she wasn't progressing at a normal rate and had unusual eye movements.

    After she was seen by a pediatrician, Kyla was rushed to BC Children's Hospital in Vancouver, where she was diagnosed with retractable seizure disorder.

    Over the next year, the little girl was placed on a series of prescription drug mixtures, received steroid shots and was given a high fat diet.

    She even developed a kidney stone. Some of the drugs had brutal side effects and she was averaging 100 seizures a day, her grandparents said.

    "The drugs aren't really working and we were told there's really nowhere she can go," Elaine Nuessler said. "She's down to her last drug. She may seizure for the rest of her very short life."

    In March, Kyla's mother and grandmother made a trip to Vancouver and were told Kyla's life expectancy would be short.

    "We both cried all the way home from Vancouver," Courtney Williams said.

    The next day, Courtney's 91-year-old grandfather called to tell her he'd seen a CNN report on Charlotte's Web and how it's been known to help children with cancer and epilepsy.

    "Her development was so similar to so many of the kids who have been helped by cannabis," Elaine Nuessler said.

    With Kyla's father working for long periods of time in Fort McMurray, the Nuesslers have become incredibly active in Kyla's life and are in the process of selling their home to accommodate the toddler and her parents.

    They say they've spoken with leading experts in the field, including Figi's doctor, and have even considered moving to Colorado, where marijuana is available.

    "Our entire support network is here," said Courtney Williams, who was trained as a health-care aide.

    Growing pot themselves is not an option because it requires detailed chemistry to create Charlotte's Web.

    The family said they want to try the marijuana to see how it will work for Kyla and understand that there are no guarantees.

    "Why not? It can't be any worse for her than some of the horrible drugs she's been put on and the side effects her little body has had to endure," Elaine Nuessler said.

    "Our main thing is access, awareness and acceptance, not only for Kyla but for other children in her situation. In my opinion you should be able to go to your doctor, get a prescription and then go to a pharmacy or dispensary and get exactly what you need."

  • Extradition in Amanda Todd case could come before Dutch trial: prosecution

    VANCOUVER - Dutch prosecutors says the possible extradition of a man accused of using the Internet to target underage girls, including B.C. teen Amanda Todd, won't necessarily have to wait until after his trial in Holland.

    Thirty-five-year-old Aydin Coban is facing charges in Canada and the Netherlands over allegations he surreptitiously recorded webcam footage of underage girls and men and then used the footage to extort them.

    The RCMP announced last week that Coban is facing five charges in B.C. related to Todd, a 15-year-old Port Coquitlam girl who turned to suicide after she was exploited online.

    B.C.'s criminal justice branch has already said it plans to ask the federal Justice Department to seek the man's extradition to face trial in Canada, but there have been questions about how quickly that could happen.

    Paul van der Zanden, a spokesman for Holland's public prosecution service, says it hasn't received a formal extradition request, so the court process in that country will continue toward a trial.

    But van der Zanden suggests that plan could change if an extradition request is made, though he says he can't speculate about precisely what would happen once that occurs.

  • Two arrested during plainclothes RCMP operation

    OSOYOOS - A plainclothes RCMP operation netted two arrests between April 16 and 17 as Mounties spent the day watching people and cars coming and going in downtown Osoyoos.

    Both arrests took place on the second day of the operation. The first happened at 1:47 a.m. when police noticed a grey 2008 Chevrolet Impala driving in an unusual manner. Officers pulled the car over at Main and 87 Street and found the man at the wheel had a cell phone though he was ordered by the court not to carry one. Police conducted a search and found drugs in the man's possession. He was arrested, the vehicle was then searched and 180 grams of marijuana was seized from the trunk of the car.

    The 19-year-old Kelowna man faces charges of possession of a controlled substance and breach of recognizance.

    The second arrest took place around 4:20 a.m. Police stopped a red 1993 Honda Civic on Highway 3 near Meadowlark Drive. The driver failed to produce a licence and gave police several false names. He was arrested for obstructing a police officer. Mounties also discovered he was driving while prohibited. A search of the car revealed a pair of brass knuckles and a small quantity of suspected crystal meth.

    The 41-year-old man from Grand Forks faces charges of driving while prohibited and his vehicle was impounded for seven days.

    To contact a reporter for this story, email marcher@infotelnews.ca, call 250-488-3065. To contact the managing editor, email Marshall Jones at mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

     

  • Kelowna man carries a million bucks in his wallet for a month

    KELOWNA - A local man bought a 6/49 ticket on his return road trip from Vancouver to Kelowna and forgot about it. A month later, he was thinking about what to do with $1 million.

    Steve Woloshyn of Kelowna purchased the ticket for the March 22 draw while getting gas at a Chevron station in Hope on Old Hope Princeton Way. He tucked it in his wallet. Woloshyn went about his business for a whole month before casually pulling it out and sliding it into a number checker to see how he'd done.

    “When I put the ticket into the machine and saw winner I figured I’d won a smaller prize, not a whole million,” he said in disbelief. “It finally began to sink in when the clerk called BCLC.”

    Woloshyn's first phone call was to his wife at home in Kelowna. She thought he was joking until he sent through a picture of the winning ticket.

    “I can’t believe I carried one million dollars in my wallet for a month,” laughed Woloshyn. “I’m an accountant for goodness sake. I should know where my money is!”

    Woloshyn will use his prize to pay off his mortgage and enjoy the summer with his wife and children.

  • Port Hardy earthquake felt across Okanagan

    KELOWNA - A series of earthquakes 90km south of Port Hardy has several Twitter users saying they felt it here in the Okanagan as well.

    According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the first quake hit at 8:10 p.m. and registered 6.7. A second 5.0 quake struck the same area seven minutes later followed by a 4.3 at 8:40 p.m.

    Several Tweet's were sent by Okanagan residents saying they felt the earthquake in Kelowna, Kamloops and Vernon, however this has not been confirmed.

    There are no reports of damage or injuries. Information will be updated as it becomes available.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

    ...More...

  • Make room for summer clothes at the first ever Closet Cleanout flea market

    KELOWNA – If the warmer weather has you thinking of upgrading your summer wardrobe, then this weekend event may be just what you’re looking for.

    The first ever Kelowna Closet Cleanout is hosting a women’s wear flea market this Saturday, featuring more than 70 booths of women’s clothing and footwear.

    Rosanne Ting-Mak Brown is the organizer and says she got the idea after attending a kid’s clothes flea market.

    “I said to my husband ‘why doesn’t anyone do this for women?’” she says.

    Although the booths sold out two weeks ago, Brown says that only means there will be plenty of stock for shoppers to choose from.

    “We’ll have everything from women’s clothes and accessories to footwear and a few other things as well. Most of the tables are individual sellers,” Brown says. “But we also have a lot of consignment stores in town excited for the event.”

    All profits as well as some unsold clothing and footwear will be donated to the Kelowna Women’s Shelter and Soles4Souls.

    “The Women’s Shelter has a lot of programs and they’re very local,” she says. “I thought it worked well and they are a deserving charity.”

    The first 200 through the door will receive gift bags and every attendee will be entered for a chance to win one of 20 door prizes donated by local businesses. There will also be a vintage photo booth supplied by Georgie Girl, a local consignment store.

    The Closet Cleanout takes place at the Sunplex Arena Saturday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    “I think it’s going to be a great time, so come on out,” Brown says.

    Admission is $5.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

    ...More...

  • Kelowna grandmother dominates at Boston Marathon

    "THEY WANTED TO BE PART OF A CELEBRATION RATHER THAN A TRAGEDY."

    KELOWNA – When Kelowna grandmother Liz Borrett received her invitation to run in the Boston Marathon for the second year in a row, she says she didn’t even hesitate.

     “I’m so glad I went back,” she says. “It was such a neat experience to share in getting Boston back in charge of the runs.”

    Borrett, 75, not only participated in the iconic marathon that was hit with a homemade bomb last year, she also placed first in the 75-79 age group.

    “I’ve got an advantage over most people because most of them aren’t old enough,” she says with a laugh. “There’s not a whole lot of us running at that age. I understand there were five that entered and three that finished.”

    Borrett, a retired nurse, started running marathons at the relatively late age of 64. She says it was simply a way to stay active and stay in shape, but acknowledges the importance of the social side of running.

    “I tend to be a person who likes to be really busy so I went and got involved in running at a fundraising event,” she says. “I’ve always been involved in some kind of physical activity, be it baseball or volleyball or aerobics. If I hadn’t done this run in Boston I’d be hiking in Turkey with my son and two granddaughters, but I’d already registered when they made their plans.”

    Finishing second in her age group last year, Borrett says her focus this year was to enjoy herself and just try to finish.

    “My goal was to do it under four hours and 30 minutes, but my biggest focus was making sure I finished the run,” she says. “I wasn’t sure how my endurance would hold up because I didn’t get the same amount of training in but it didn’t impact my time. That’s a good time for me.”

    Borrett’s training was interrupted in January when she tripped on a sidewalk during a run and broke her collarbone. The injury prevented her from running for seven weeks.

    “I haven’t got a lot of time to waste,” says Borrett, who finished 30 minutes ahead of the second place with a time of 4 hours and 22 minutes. “It was a good time for me. It was only during the last three kilometres that my head was kind of negative. A positive attitude is a big part of running.”

    Borrett, who has lived in Kelowna for more than 50 years, says she noticed some interesting differences at the marathon this year.

    “During the run there was a bit more socializing this time,” she says. “People were asking where I was from and if I was there last year. It felt good to be there and it was very easy to meet people. It felt like people were reaching out to each other more this year. Everyone was being really supportive and like they wanted to be part of a celebration rather than a tragedy.”

    Borrett’s next challenge will be competing in the New York Marathon in November.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

    ...More...

  • Extradition in Amanda Todd case could come before Dutch trial: prosecution

    VANCOUVER - Dutch prosecutors says the possible extradition of a man accused of using the Internet to target underage girls, including B.C. teen Amanda Todd, won't necessarily have to wait until after his trial in Holland.

    Thirty-five-year-old Aydin Coban is facing charges in Canada and the Netherlands over allegations he surreptitiously recorded webcam footage of underage girls and men and then used the footage to extort them.

    The RCMP announced last week that Coban is facing five charges in B.C. related to Todd, a 15-year-old Port Coquitlam girl who turned to suicide after she was exploited online.

    B.C.'s criminal justice branch has already said it plans to ask the federal Justice Department to seek the man's extradition to face trial in Canada, but there have been questions about how quickly that could happen.

    Paul van der Zanden, a spokesman for Holland's public prosecution service, says it hasn't received a formal extradition request, so the court process in that country will continue toward a trial.

    But van der Zanden suggests that plan could change if an extradition request is made, though he says he can't speculate about precisely what would happen once that occurs.

    ...More...

  • Two arrested during plainclothes RCMP operation

    OSOYOOS - A plainclothes RCMP operation netted two arrests between April 16 and 17 as Mounties spent the day watching people and cars coming and going in downtown Osoyoos.

    Both arrests took place on the second day of the operation. The first happened at 1:47 a.m. when police noticed a grey 2008 Chevrolet Impala driving in an unusual manner. Officers pulled the car over at Main and 87 Street and found the man at the wheel had a cell phone though he was ordered by the court not to carry one. Police conducted a search and found drugs in the man's possession. He was arrested, the vehicle was then searched and 180 grams of marijuana was seized from the trunk of the car.

    The 19-year-old Kelowna man faces charges of possession of a controlled substance and breach of recognizance.

    The second arrest took place around 4:20 a.m. Police stopped a red 1993 Honda Civic on Highway 3 near Meadowlark Drive. The driver failed to produce a licence and gave police several false names. He was arrested for obstructing a police officer. Mounties also discovered he was driving while prohibited. A search of the car revealed a pair of brass knuckles and a small quantity of suspected crystal meth.

    The 41-year-old man from Grand Forks faces charges of driving while prohibited and his vehicle was impounded for seven days.

    To contact a reporter for this story, email marcher@infotelnews.ca, call 250-488-3065. To contact the managing editor, email Marshall Jones at mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

     

    ...More...

  • Kelowna man carries a million bucks in his wallet for a month

    KELOWNA - A local man bought a 6/49 ticket on his return road trip from Vancouver to Kelowna and forgot about it. A month later, he was thinking about what to do with $1 million.

    Steve Woloshyn of Kelowna purchased the ticket for the March 22 draw while getting gas at a Chevron station in Hope on Old Hope Princeton Way. He tucked it in his wallet. Woloshyn went about his business for a whole month before casually pulling it out and sliding it into a number checker to see how he'd done.

    “When I put the ticket into the machine and saw winner I figured I’d won a smaller prize, not a whole million,” he said in disbelief. “It finally began to sink in when the clerk called BCLC.”

    Woloshyn's first phone call was to his wife at home in Kelowna. She thought he was joking until he sent through a picture of the winning ticket.

    “I can’t believe I carried one million dollars in my wallet for a month,” laughed Woloshyn. “I’m an accountant for goodness sake. I should know where my money is!”

    Woloshyn will use his prize to pay off his mortgage and enjoy the summer with his wife and children.

    ...More...

  • Puppy survives being shot with pellets

    THOMPSON-OKANAGAN — A puppy is recovering in Salmon Arm after being found with multiple pellet-shot wounds near Niskonlith Lake.

    The four-month-old German shepherd puppy was found by a couple people walking their dogs.

    “Some individuals out walking their dogs by Nisquanles Lake earlier this month saw the puppy cowering under a bush,” says B.C. SPCA senior animal protection officer Kathy Woodward. “They took him to a veterinary clinic in Salmon Arm, where the pellets were removed.”

    She notes that one of the pellets surgically removed was only one millimetre from puppy’s aorta.

    The veterinarian caring for the puppy is covering the full costs of his medical care and one of the clinic staff plans to adopt the dog.

    “Thankfully, the puppy will recover and will be adopted into a loving home, but the SPCA is seeking information leading to charges in the case,” says Const. Woodward. “It is important that people understand that animal cruelty is not acceptable and those who inflict pain and suffering on animals will be brought to justice.”

    The B.C. SPCA is asking anyone with information about the incident to please contact the B.C. SPCA animal cruelty hotline at 1-855-622-7722.

    To contact a reporter for this story, email Jennifer Stahn at jstahn@infotelnews.ca or call 250-819-3723. To contact an editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

    ...More...

  • Rockets shot down in game 3 of 7 in Portland

    PORTLAND - The Portland Winterhawks defeated the Kelowna Rockets 4-3 in overtime on Tuesday night at the Moda Centre in Portland, OR, to grab a two-games-to-one lead in the Western Hockey League's Western Conference final.

    The Winterhawks outshot Kelowna 65-33 but had to score twice in the game's final 2:59, both times with the goalie pulled for the extra attacker, to erase a 3-1 Rockets lead and force overtime.

    Rockets netminder Jordon Cooke was sensational as he held the 'Hawks shooters at bay throughout the game, until the two late goals. The Hawks Taylor Leier scored the winner midway through overtime to win the game.

    "Jordon Cooke was fantastic tonight. He's the only reason we had an opportunity to win this game," said Rockets assistant coach Dan Lambert on the AM1150 post game show. "They just kept pressing and we couldnt get our bearings. We gave them too much time and space and they were the better team tonight."

    The Rockets led 1-0 after the first period as Riley Stadel scored an early goal, his third of the playoffs.

    After Oliver Bjorkstrand tied the game 1-1 in the second, Cole Martin scored his first goal of the season, restoring Kelowna's lead and the Rockets went to the dressing room after two, with a 2-1 lead.

    Ryan Olsen scored to make it 3-1 Rockets with just over five minutes to play in the third as the Rockets jumped ahead by two.

    However Portland scored a power play goal with the goalie pulled to make it 3-2 before Brendan Leipsic tied the game at 3-3 with 1:18 to go in the third, also with the goalie on the bench.

    "We've got to tighten up defensively," said Lambert. "They have been winning a lot more battles than we have."

    Attendance at Portland's Moda Centre was 9,259 on Tuesday and the the series continues on Wednesday night with game four in Portland.

    Game five in the series is set for Friday night in Kelowna.

    Tickets are available for game five at Prospera Place through www.selectyourtickets.com, at the box office or at 250-762-5050.

    ...More...

  • Kelowna dad's latest film showcases daughter's favourite toys

    KELOWNA – A local filmmaker's most recent video received a rave review from the person who means the most to him.

    Clayton Arnall is no stranger to good reviews. His short film about a new sport called bouldering was shown at the Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival, but his latest production is even closer to his heart.

    Bullfrog’s Payback is a stop motion film Arnall made for his three-year-old daughter, Brighton. It features three of her favourite toys croaking and hopping along the back of a couch.

    “My daughter really likes frogs,” Arnall says. “She’s basically slept with that tree frog every night for the last two years. She won’t go to sleep without that frog.”

    Arnall says the stop motion video was more time consuming than he thought it would be.

    “It took me about an hour to shoot and about three hours to edit,” he says. “It’s time consuming because you have to shoot each frame, move the frog a little bit, and shoot another frame.”

    Arnall says that although the video took longer than expected, his daughters reaction was well worth the time and effort.

    “She loved it. She really likes home videos and this was with her toys so she laughed and watched it around 20 times in a row. I have another idea for a more complicated stop motion with toys. Maybe one day I’ll get around to it.”

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Adam Proskiw at aproskiw@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-0428. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

    ...More...