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Japan zoo apologizes for naming newborn monkey Charlotte after British princess

In this Wednesday, May 6, 2015 photo released by the Takasakiyama Natural Zoological Garden, a newborn baby monkey named Charlotte clings to her mother at the zoo in Oita, southern Japan. The Japanese zoo has apologized for naming the baby monkey Charlotte after the newborn British princess following complaints at home. The Takasakiyama Natural Zoological Garden said Thursday, May 7 it was considering renaming the macaque. It was flooded with angry calls and emails Wednesday hours after announcing the name for its first born monkey of the year, a tradition at the city-run zoo.
Image Credit: The Takasakiyama Natural Zoological Garden via AP
May 07, 2015 - 8:36 AM

TOKYO - A Japanese zoo has apologized after receiving complaints over naming a baby monkey Charlotte for the newborn British princess.

The Takasakiyama Natural Zoological Garden said Thursday it was considering renaming the macaque. It was flooded with angry calls and emails Wednesday hours after announcing the name for its first monkey born this year, a tradition at the zoo run by the southern city of Oita.

Charlotte was the favourite in a public ballot, receiving 59 out of 853 votes before the female monkey was born Wednesday.

Votes for Charlotte surged after the British princess was named Monday and topped the ballot in the last three days of voting, which ran from March 27 to May 6.

Opponents largely said giving the princess' name to a monkey was disrespectful to British royals. According to zoo official Akira Asano, some of them said that the Japanese people would feel offended if a monkey were named after Japanese princesses.

The complaints originated in Japan. Asano said he was not aware of any complaints from British citizens. He said the zoo has also received support for Charlotte, and the views are now largely divided.

"We deeply apologize for causing trouble to many people over the naming of the first baby (monkey)," said a statement posted on the zoo website. "We take these opinions seriously."

Officials of the zoo and the city were still discussing what to do with the monkey's name. The zoo now plans to seek advice from the British Embassy before making a final decision, Kyodo News agency reported.

The embassy declined to comment, and Japan's foreign ministry said it was not involved with the issue.

News from © The Associated Press, 2015
The Associated Press

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