Current Conditions

Light Snow
-5.8°C

The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Norway House residents Leon Swanson, front second from left, and David Tait Jr., front second from right, are comforted by family and friends at a press conference in Winnipeg, Friday, August 26, 2016 where former Aboriginal Affairs Minister for Manitoba Eric Robinson announced that the two men were switched at birth in 1975 when their mothers gave birth at Norway House Indian Hospital. The RCMP says it has started an investigation into two cases of babies who were switched at birth at a northern Manitoba hospital more than 40 years ago. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
October 07, 2016 - 2:10 PM

Highlights from the news file for Friday, Oct. 7

CANADA GAINS 67,200 NET JOBS IN SEPTEMBER: The country's labour force beat expectations last month by gaining a healthy 67,200 net new jobs, with most of the increase concentrated in part-time and self-employed work, Statistics Canada said Friday. Despite the surge, the agency's latest jobs survey said the national unemployment rate didn't budge — remaining seven per cent for the second straight month — as more people entered the workforce. Of the new jobs, 44,100 of them were considered part-time work, while 50,100 were self-employed positions — some of which may have been unpaid. The more-desirable categories of full-time work saw a boost of 23,000 jobs, while paid employee positions rose 17,000 last month, the report said.

____

FEDS DON'T PLAN TO HIKE MINIMUM WAGE: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says his government is looking at other ways to help Canadian families rather than hiking the minimum wage. He told a question and answer session in Toronto Friday that he is instead looking to help Canadians succeed by giving families more money through the new child benefit, making investments in infrastructure to boost productivity and making post-secondary education more available to less affluent students. The New Democrats have called for an increase in the federal minimum wage, which would only cover workers in federally regulated businesses, such as banks and telecommunications companies. Minimum wages for most workers are set by provincial governments.

____

HURRICANE THREATENS STORIED SOUTHERN CITIES: Hurricane Matthew spared Florida's most heavily populated stretch from a catastrophic blow Friday but threatened some of the South's most historic and picturesque cities with ruinous flooding and wind damage as it pushed its way up the coastline. Among the cities in the crosshairs were St. Augustine, Florida; Savannah, Georgia; and Charleston, South Carolina. "There are houses that will probably not ever be the same again or not even be there," St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver lamented as battleship-grey floodwaters coursed through the streets of the 451-year-old city founded by the Spanish. Matthew — the most powerful hurricane to threaten the Atlantic Seaboard in over a decade — set off alarm as it closed in on the U.S., having left more than 300 people dead in Haiti.

___

STORM PROMPTS CRUISE SHIP TO DIVERT TO HALIFAX: Hurricane Matthew has forced a Disney cruise ship to divert to Atlantic Canada. The Disney Magic was to leave New York City Friday for the Bahamas and Florida, but is now heading to the Nova Scotia ports of Sydney and Halifax as well as Saint John, N.B. The ship, which can carry 2,700 passengers, arrives Tuesday in Halifax.

____

RCMP LOOKING AT SWITCHED-AT-BIRTH CASES: The RCMP says it has started an investigation into two cases of babies who were switched at birth at a northern Manitoba hospital more than 40 years ago. "The RCMP has an obligation to the families involved and to the public to determine if the incidents at the Norway House Indian Hospital were accidental or criminal in nature," Mounties said in a news release Friday. They said the investigation will be separate from a review the federal government has already announced. Two men from Garden Hill First Nation revealed last year that DNA tests had proved they were switched at birth at the hospital in 1975. Two other men from Norway House, born at the same hospital in the same year, came forward with the same story in August. DNA tests confirmed their story last month.

___

COMPANIES EXPECT BUSINESS IN THE US WILL SLOW: A new survey by the Bank of Canada suggests companies are preparing for slower growth in the U.S. due to uncertainty about the outcome of the presidential election. The poll says some firms have noticed a recent soft patch in demand for their products and services from clients south of the border. Overall, the survey says firms' sales growth expectations for the next 12 months have improved modestly from a weak level in the July edition of the quarterly poll.

____

CANADIANS MAY PAY HIGHER RATES ON THEIR MORTGAGES: Mortgage brokers are warning that changes by the federal government will make it harder for non-bank lenders to operate. They say the result could be less competition and higher rates for homeowners. James Laird, president of mortgage company CanWise Financial says the non-bank mortgage lenders offer important competition for the big banks. Starting Nov. 30, new rules will place new limits on the types of mortgages that can be insured. The brokers say the change will make operating more difficult for non-bank mortgage lenders, who raise the money they use to lend to homebuyers by selling packages of insured mortgages to investors.

____

KAINE TELLS SENIORS CLINTON WILL LOOK AFTER THEM: U.S. Democratic vice-presidential candidate Tim Kaine is telling seniors in swing state Nevada that his running mate Hillary Clinton would better look after their needs than Republican Donald Trump. Kaine told a retirement community outside Las Vegas that Clinton would be "rock solid" in her commitment to preserving Social Security. Trump has vowed to protect the safety net program for seniors, but Kaine said the Republican presidential candidate can't be trusted because of his past criticism of Social Security. Trump once called the program a "Ponzi scheme" in one of his books.

____

SERVICE AT DAMAGED NEW JERSEY TRAIN STATION TO RESUME NEXT WEEK: Rail service at a New Jersey transit station damaged after a deadly train crash will resume next week. New Jersey Transit says a portion of the Hoboken Terminal will reopen Monday morning. Investigators say the train was travelling twice the speed limit when it crashed into the station Sept. 29, killing a woman on the platform and injuring more than 100 people. Service on the commuter line into the busy station that connects travellers to trains headed for New York City has been out since.

____

News from © The Canadian Press, 2016
The Canadian Press

  • Popular kamloops News
  • Comments

View Site in: Desktop | Mobile