Ambrosia apple recipe contest

Ambrosia Apples announced today it has launched its Orchard to Table Recipe Contest online at

“The contest is about bringing people, food and fantastic flavors together, with a chance to win great prizes,” said a spokesperson for the group. “Ambrosia apples were created by nature and we want to know how Canadians create in the kitchen with them. Then we’ll share those recipes with the world.”

Ambrosia apples are unique as an ingredient in recipes as they are slow to brown, have a natural sweetness, and retain their shape when baked or cooked. The main rule for the contest is that Ambrosia apples – raw or cooked – must be prominently featured in the dish.

There are four prizes from Cuisinart and Breville totaling over $1500. First prize is a Cuisinart 5.5 quart stand mixer, second prize is a Breville Juice Fountain® Elite and third prize is a Breville All in One™. There is also a People’s Choice prize of a Cuisinart 5.5 quart stand mixer.

The contest begins at 9 a.m. November 1 and runs through to December 10 at 4 p.m. Full rules and regulations can be found online at

About Ambrosia

Ambrosia apples were discovered in the Mennells’ orchard in the sun-drenched Similkameen Valley of British Columbia. In the early 1990s, workers in the orchard picked and tasted the bi-coloured apples from a lone tree unlike the others in the orchard. The fruit was so good they stripped the tree clean.

The Mennells took over where Mother Nature left off and created more trees. To their excitement, the resulting apples were as perfect in appearance and taste as the apples from the original mother tree. The bi-coloured apple was named Ambrosia, which in Greek mythology means food of the gods. The apple was registered in 1993 and over the past 20 years, it has grown in popularity and is now grown and available for purchase worldwide.

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