Unmarked graves of early settlers, slaves found in Delaware

REHOBOTH BEACH, Del. - An archaeologist has uncovered the graves of some of Delaware's earliest settlers, including the state's earliest known grave site of African-Americans.

The News Journal in Wilmington reported Tuesday that the unmarked graves were found in 2014 on a former plantation near Rehoboth Beach. The remains were examined by experts at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Eight people of European descent were buried at the site sometime between 1665 and 1695. The remains of three African-Americans also were found but buried separately. Two were likely slaves. The third was a 5-year-old child.

Archaeologist Dan Griffith made the discovery on a former plantation known as Avery's Rest. Experts say the discovery could push the boundaries of what's known about the region's early settlers.

___

Information from: The News Journal of Wilmington, Del., http://www.delawareonline.com


don-thompson
THOMPSON: Never too old for romance
OPINION It’s funny - both humorous and peculiar - how circumstances can change your life. I came to the Okanagan seven years ago because two of my best friends - both Canadians - and I planned to build a championship golf co

Top News