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Latest Minnesota news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. CST

PREGNANT WOMAN KILLED

2 people charged with death of pregnant woman in Minneapolis

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Two people were charged Tuesday in the beating death of a pregnant woman whose body was discovered last week in Minneapolis. One of the suspects is a convicted sex offender. Shannon Michael Benson, of Minneapolis, and Jade M. Rissell, of Elk River, are accused in connection with killing the woman, whose identity was unknown when police found her body in a burned-out travel trailer on Nov. 8. Police say they have identified the victim but are waiting for conformation from the medical examiner. Investigators said the victim had been reported missing in Anoka sometime between Oct. 29 and 31. Benson and Rissell are scheduled to appear in court Wednesday.

VIRUS OUTBREAK

Cases surge in new COVID hot spots of Michigan, Minnesota

Hospitals in Michigan and Minnesota are reporting a wave of COVID-19 patients not seen in months. Beds are filling with unvaccinated people, and health care providers are warning that staff are being worn down by yet another surge. Michigan had slightly more than 3,000 COVID-19 patients in hospitals this week for the first time since spring. Nearly all hospital beds were occupied in Minnesota. Meanwhile, some states are ignoring federal guidance and expanding boosters. Arkansas this week joined California, Colorado and New Mexico in offering them to anyone 18 or older. Michigan has the country’s highest seven-day COVID-19 case rate at 503 per 100,000 people.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-MINNESOTA

Minnesota ready to allow COVID-19 boosters for all adults

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm says Minnesota officials are so alarmed about the continued surge in COVID-19 cases that they're ready to start allowing vaccine booster shots for all adults by the end of the week if the federal government doesn’t approve them first. Other states are taking similar steps. Malcolm announced the plan on a day when Minnesota’s COVID-19 death toll eclipsed 9,000 people. The state is struggling with some of the nation’s highest rates of new infections. Minnesota had seen the country’s worst rate over the past week. But new federal data show that Michigan has overtaken Minnesota.

LAW ENFORCEMENT-BODY CAMERAS

Hundreds of Minnesota officers, agents getting body cameras

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Hundreds of state law enforcement officers in Minnesota will soon be outfitted with new body cameras to record everything from traffic stops to civil disturbances. More than 600 Minnesota State Patrol troopers, nearly 200 Department of Natural Resources conservation officers, Bureau of Criminal Apprehension agents and other state-level law enforcement officers will soon wear the 1,100 body cameras that have been ordered. The Legislature previously approved more than $8 million to buy the cameras and provide for data storage. The State Patrol will begin distributing the cameras to troopers starting next month.

SANFORD HEALTH CEO-SEVERANCE

Former Sanford CEO paid more than $49 million last year

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Internal Revenue Service filings show former Sanford Health CEO Kelby Krabbenhoft was paid more than $49 million in salary, severance and other payouts last year. Krabbenhoft left Sanford last year after nearly a quarter century, receiving a combination of salary, incentive-based pay, severance and two lump sum payouts from supplemental executive retirement plans. The Argus Leader reports about $15 million was paid as severance and another $29 million was given through the retirement plan, which was started in 1983 specifically for Sanford’s executives. The amount paid to Krabbenhoft upon his departure is shown on the regional health system’s IRS form 990, which is filed annually.

AP-US-ELECTION-2022-MINNESOTA-ATTORNEY-GENERAL

Ellison, who led Chauvin prosecution, seeks 2nd term as AG

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Democratic Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison says he'll seek a second term. Ellison led the prosecution team that won the conviction of ex-officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd. The announcement via Zoom featured some of Ellison’s endorsers, including U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a former prosecutor who touted Ellison’s handling of the Chauvin trial, calling it an “act of courage” and citing the international attention the proceedings received. Ellison is Minnesota’s first Black attorney general. He was also the first Muslim elected to Congress, a job he left in 2018. He's vowing to continue fighting for a fair economy.

EMERGENCY LANDING

Flight makes emergency landing at Twin Cities airport

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Spirit Airlines flight that took off from Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport made an emergency landing after a pilot reported a possible engine fire. The flight took off about 7:30 p.m. Sunday and was headed for Orlando, but within minutes returned to the Twin Cities airport. The Federal Aviation Administration issued a statement that said the Airbus A320 landed safely about 7:50 p.m. and taxied to the terminal. No injuries were reported. The FAA plans to investigate. Airport officials say fire crews responded, but did not find a fire. Spirit Airlines says another airplane transported passengers to Orlando.

GEORGE FLOYD-MINNEAPOLIS POLICE

Residents seek role in federal probe into Minneapolis police

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minneapolis activists are collecting accounts of police misconduct from community members for a federal civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis police to ensure they have a say in any potential changes. The Justice Department launched the probe in April to determine if there is a pattern or practice of policing in the city where George Floyd was murdered that is unlawful or unconstitutional. Federal investigators are examining the Minneapolis police force’s current systems of accountability and whether the department’s officers have engaged in discriminatory policing. The Justice Department’s Civil Rights division conducted nearly 70 formal probes of police departments across the country between 1997 and 2016, resulting in 40 reform agreements.

News from © The Associated Press, 2021
The Associated Press

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