Five stories in the news today, Dec. 11 | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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Five stories in the news today, Dec. 11

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau greets a family of refugees from Syria as they arrive at Pearson International airport, in Toronto, on Friday, Dec. 11, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
December 11, 2015 - 1:15 AM

Five stories in the news today, Dec. 11, from The Canadian Press:

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GOVERNMENT PLANELOAD OF SYRIAN REFUGEES ARRIVES IN TORONTO

A Canadian government plane brought 163 Syrian refugees into Toronto late last night. It's part of the Trudeau government's commitment to bring 25,000 Syrians to Canada by the end of February. While Syrian refugees have been arriving with some regularity since the Liberals were sworn into office on Nov. 4, they've arrived on commercial flights. This is the first time a government aircraft has been pressed into service specifically for them.

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POLICE FIND VEHICLE IN CASE OF MISSING CANADIAN IN GRENADA

Police in the small Caribbean island of Grenada say they have found a vehicle that may have been involved in the disappearance of a New Brunswick woman and they are also searching for a 26-year old "person of interest" in the case. There have been few leads since Linnea Veinotte was reported missing last Sunday morning. Veinotte had been out jogging with her dog when she went missing.

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OIL COMPANIES FIND WAYS TO AVOID PINK SLIPS

Some companies in Canada's oil patch are looking for alternatives to laying off people during the current downturn in the sector. Canadian Natural Resources says it went to staff with a wage reduction proposal and was able to avoid trimming its workforce of 7,600. Despite some companies efforts to look at alternatives to layoffs, at least 40,000 jobs have been shed in Canada's oil and gas industry this year, with the bulk in Alberta.

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CHRISTIAN LAW SCHOOL MOVES CLOSER TO ACCREDITATION

An evangelical Christian university under fire across the country for forbidding sexual intimacy outside of heterosexual marriage has secured a decisive legal victory in its effort to open a law school in British Columbia. B.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson ruled in favour of Trinity Western University, reversing a B.C. Law Society decision to deny accreditation for graduates of its proposed law school who want to practise in the province. In his decision, Hinkson rebuked the society for breaching its duty of procedural fairness and neglecting to fully consider the school's charter rights.

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REPORT CLEARED CBC IN GHOMESHI CASE

Federal government documents say labour investigators concluded the CBC did not violate any labour laws in the wake of the broadcaster's decision to part ways with radio host Jian Ghomeshi. The documents obtained by The Canadian Press concluded the CBC met federal labour laws requiring employers to protect their workers from sexual harassment. Ghomeshi has been charged with several counts of sexual assault, but has pleaded not guilty.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY ...

— The Assembly of First Nations holds a Special Chiefs Assembly in Gatineau, Que.

— Ski-Doo and Sea-Doo maker BRP Inc., and Hudson's Bay Company release third-quarter results.

— Statistics Canada will release Canada's international investment position for the third quarter.

— Former TV journalist Arthur Kent's defamation lawsuit continues in Calgary.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2015
The Canadian Press

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