Rescue tech who died in accident had chute tangle, lost track of height: report - InfoNews

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Rescue tech who died in accident had chute tangle, lost track of height: report

MCpl Alfred Barr, of 435 Transport and Rescue Squadron, is seen in an undated handout photo. A military investigation report says a parachute accident which killed a search and rescue technician near Yorkton, Sask., in March 2017 came after the man's chute became twisted as he jumped in a low-level exercise. It says Master Cpl. Alfred Barr waited too long to cut away his tangled main chute and deploy his reserve. Barr, who was qualified as a jumper, but was still relatively inexperienced, was taking part in an exercise which involved a jump from a C-30 Hercules aircraft. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-DND, 17 Wing Winnipeg, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
April 13, 2018 - 12:46 PM

OTTAWA - A military investigation report says an accident that killed a search and rescue technician near Yorkton, Sask., in March 2017 came after the man's chute became twisted as he jumped in a low-level exercise.

It says Master Cpl. Alfred Barr waited too long to cut away his tangled main chute and deploy his reserve.

Barr, who was qualified as a jumper but relatively inexperienced, was taking part in an exercise involving a jump from a C-130 Hercules aircraft.

He had completed his semi-annual parachute emergency training two days before the accident.

The report says Barr followed his team leader out the aircraft door during the jump from just over 600 metres, but rolled slightly in the slipstream after he exited and when the static line pulled his parachute open, the suspension lines became twisted.

Barr made repeated efforts to clear the lines as he fell, but apparently lost track of his height.

"While attempting to clear the twists, he likely lost situational awareness of his altitude and descent rate," the report said. "As a result, he did not take action to cut away and deploy his reserve parachute before reaching the ground."

The report from the Department of National Defence Airworthiness Investigative Authority called for enhanced training and suggested the military look at using altimeters which would provide audible warnings about height.

Barr was a member of 435 Transport and Rescue Squadron at 17 Wing in Winnipeg.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2018
The Canadian Press

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