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  • Puppy survives being shot with pellets

    THOMPSON-OKANAGAN — A puppy is recovering in Salmon Arm after being found with multiple pellet-shot wounds near Niskonlith Lake.

    The four-month-old German shepherd puppy was found by a couple people walking their dogs.

    “Some individuals out walking their dogs by Nisquanles Lake earlier this month saw the puppy cowering under a bush,” says B.C. SPCA senior animal protection officer Kathy Woodward. “They took him to a veterinary clinic in Salmon Arm, where the pellets were removed.”

    She notes that one of the pellets surgically removed was only one millimetre from puppy’s aorta.

    The veterinarian caring for the puppy is covering the full costs of his medical care and one of the clinic staff plans to adopt the dog.

    “Thankfully, the puppy will recover and will be adopted into a loving home, but the SPCA is seeking information leading to charges in the case,” says Const. Woodward. “It is important that people understand that animal cruelty is not acceptable and those who inflict pain and suffering on animals will be brought to justice.”

    The B.C. SPCA is asking anyone with information about the incident to please contact the B.C. SPCA animal cruelty hotline at 1-855-622-7722.

    To contact a reporter for this story, email Jennifer Stahn at jstahn@infotelnews.ca or call 250-819-3723. To contact an editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

  • Teachers and B.C. government must end ongoing bitterness with contract: parent

    VANCOUVER - The chairman of a Parent Advisory Committee at a Vancouver school says job action by teachers starting today is pitting parents against the educators and the government.

    Robert Ford says parents have had enough after 10 years of bitterness between both sides, which must negotiate a contract for the sake of students.

    The first phase of the strike means teachers will not supervise students outside the classroom or communicate in writing with principals and other administrators.

    B.C. Teachers Federation president Jim Iker wouldn't say how long this phase of job action would last, but says it will escalate to rotating job action if progress isn't being made at the bargaining table.

    Iker says the government has offered a 6.25 per cent wage hike but teachers want a nine-per-cent jump, plus a cost-of-living increase, which the government has said could equal an untenable 13 per cent raise over three years.

    The union is refusing to sign a 10-year contract agreement, and says it wants class size and composition provisions restored in its contract in keeping with a B.C. Supreme Court decision that awarded the union $2 million in damages.

  • Canadian sailor dies under mysterious circumstances in Tanzanian hospital

    OTTAWA - A Canadian sailor on his way home for leave has died in hospital in Tanzania.

    The crewman belonged to HMCS Regina, currently patrolling the Indian Ocean as part of a multinational task force combating terrorism and pirates in the region.

    A release from National Defence did not identify the man, nor state his age, but said the circumstances surrounding the death are unclear.

    The family has asked that the name not be released, although it's known the crew member was based at Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt, B.C., the navy's main station on the West Coast.

    Military police have been in touch authorities in the East African country and will be investigating.

    Cmdr. Daniel Charlebois, skipper of the Regina, said a statement the sailor was well liked and respected by his peers.

  • 1 in 3 Canadians suffered some form of child abuse; linked to mental disorders

    TORONTO - A new study says one in three adult Canadians suffered some form of child abuse in their past, adding this abuse is associated with a higher risk of mental health disorders later in life.

    The lead author of the study says it provides the first national look at the prevalence of child abuse experienced by Canadian adults.

    Tracie Afifi of the University of Manitoba says previous estimates were based on a nearly 25-year-old study from Ontario and more recent data from Quebec.

    The study is published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

    The authors studied data collected from more than 23,000 adults 18 and older who took part in Statistic Canada's 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Respondents were asked questions about whether they were hit or subjected to other forms of physical or sexual abuse in childhood, or whether they were exposed to violence between the adults in their homes.

    Afifi says the questions didn't ask "Were you abused?" because studies have shown that some people who have been abused don't characterize their experiences as abuse.

    Instead, the questions asked whether respondents were slapped on the face or head, spanked with a hard object, pushed, grabbed, shoved or had something thrown at them to hurt them. For both those questions, respondents were asked to say yes only if the behaviour had happened a minimum of three times.

    Another question asked if respondents were kicked, bit, punched, choked, burned or physically attacked at least once.

    Sexual abuse questions were designed to determine whether respondents were forced into unwanted sexual activity. And the questions related to having witnessed intimate partner violence asked whether as children they had seen their parents, step-parents or guardians hit each other or other adults in the home three or more times.

    One in three adults reported experiences that met the criteria for at least one of the types of abuse, with physical abuse the most common of the three; 26 per cent of respondents said they had experienced physical abuse.

    Ten per cent of respondents said they had experienced sexual abuse and nearly eight per cent witnessed intimate partner violence.

    Men were more likely than women to have experienced physical abuse, 31 per cent versus 21 per cent. But women were more likely to have experienced sexual abuse, 14 per cent versus nearly six per cent.

    The researchers went a step further, looking to see if rates of mental illness were higher among adults who had suffered abuse in childhood.

    "We found strong associations between child abuse and mental conditions," they wrote.

    This type of study cannot prove cause-and-effect; it can only point to possible links.

  • Peachfest Tribute Night for those about to rock

    PENTICTON — Peachfest is hosting its first ever Tribute Night during this year’s festivities.

    Tribute bands, including Forever Young (Neil Young), High Voltage (AC/DC), and U4 (U2) will light up the beachfront of Lake Okanagan on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014.

    “It will be quite a night,” said Bill Kolter, director of Peachfest Entertainment. The organizers have booked tribute bands before, including High Voltage and Forever Young, but they have never had a full night of purely tribute performances.

    “People keep asking us to bring them back,” Kolter said of the AC/DC tribute band, who will play their fifth Peachfest this year. It will be the second appearance from Forever Young, and the first from U4.

    Also taking the stage on other nights are classic bands Emerson Drive, Trooper and the Stampeders.

    The 67th annual festival is scheduled August 6-10.  There is no admission charge.

    To contact the reporter for this story, email Meaghan Archer at marcher@infotelnews.ca or call 250-488-3065. To contact the editor, email mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.