The summertime phenomenon that gives Kalamalka Lake its many colours

The shimmering colours of Kalamalka Lake.
Image Credit: Instagram/ Sean Donovan (@sndon)

VERNON - If the vibrant colours of Kalamalka Lake have you checking the tint on your sunglasses, rest assured, your shades aren’t playing tricks on you. The lake really is that incredible blue-green hue, and here’s why.

Tourism Vernon explained the phenomenon on its Facebook page, and it goes like this:

Kalamalka Lake is what’s called a ‘marl’ lake and contains limestone deposits left behind by receding glaciers. When the water warms up in the summer, the dissolved limestone crystallizes and makes it look like gallons of blue and green Kool-aid was poured into the lake. But the dazzling colours are only temporary. When the lake cools down, the limestone crystals vanish, and so does the green-blue hue.

The lake is, of course, a sight to behold at any time of the year, but it’s this summertime phenomenon that has earned it the title of ‘the lake of many colours.’

To contact the reporter for this story, email Charlotte Helston at chelston@infonews.ca or call 250-309-5230. To contact the editor, email mjones@infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.


In this image released by Lionsgate, Becky G portrays Trini, the Yellow Ranger, left, and Elizabeth Banks portrays Rita Repulsa in a scene from "Power Rangers."
Are 'gay moments' in 'Beauty' and 'Power Rangers' progress?
LOS ANGELES - A hug. A wink. A dance. A non-answer. These are the so-called gay moments in a handful of recent high-profile studio movies that have sparked both rapturous celebration and startling backlash. From Sulu in "Star Trek Beyo

Top News