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Shooting victim facing further victimization by bureaucracy

Wayne Belleville of Oliver continues to recover after a shooting incident that took place on July 22 in the mountains above Oliver.
Image Credit: GoFundMe
August 14, 2015 - 8:00 PM

PENTICTON - The man allegedly shot by prolific offender Ronald Teneycke finds himself frustrated by bureaucracy as he continues to heal from the harrowing experience.

Wayne Belleville, 58, says he’s not quite ready to talk about being shot by Teneycke after meeting the man on a remote logging road above Oliver on July 22.

As he recovers from his ordeal, he says he's finding the bureaucracy at the Insurance Corporation of B.C. to be vexing and insulting as he tries to get compensation for the truck and tools he claims Teneycke wrecked.

“It’s been weeks and no estimator has looked at my truck. It’s insulting not to have this expedited and treated like an accident," Belleville says. "This happened during an armed robbery where I was shot. If it wasn’t for the support of the community, I’d be in trouble.”

Belleville says he came across the career criminal on a remote logging road in the mountains east of Oliver. Tenecyke said he was part of a grouse hunting expedition and had become lost in the bush. When Belleville tried to run away, he was shot in the back with a .22 rifle.

He continues to recover from the shooting, which resulted in bullet fragments entering his spleen and lung. A bullet fragment in his hip left him with an incision, which took 38 staples to close.

“The physical part of healing has been going all right. I’m healing that way at an accelerated rate," he says. "It’s the psychological part that’s not so good,” says Belleville.

Belleville is also frustrated by the legal system, upset Tenecyke was not charged with attempted murder.

“They (Crown) didn’t even bother to tell me they weren’t charging him. I found out through the media,” he says, adding the RCMP told him they were recommending charges of attempted murder.

“I only spent limited time with him and I can tell you he’s a complete sociopath, lacking any concern or empathy for anyone,” he says.

On a positive note, Belleville says he feels like he "won his life in a lottery” by surviving an encounter with a man like Teneycke under the circumstances he did.

“Everything is healable and I’m taking some comfort knowing he’s in a cell for 24 hours a day, seven days a week."

To contact the reporter for this story, email Steve Arstad at sarstad@infonews.ca or call 250-488-3065. To contact the editor, email mjones@infonews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

News from © InfoTel News Ltd, 2015
InfoTel News Ltd

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