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Kamloops weeds get wacked by herd of goats

Herds of goats keep noxious weeds under control in Kamloops controlled areas, July 29, 2014.
Image Credit: City of Kamloops
July 29, 2014 - 2:24 PM

KAMLOOPS - The goats are back for a second season to munch their way through noxious weeds found in city of Kamloops controlled areas where mechanical and chemical methods aren't possible.

To get the job done, the city has again hired the services of Rocky Ridge Vegetation Control and their hungry herd of 300 goats. Weeds such as spikey, invasive plumeless thistle are delicious to the four-legged, two-horned, cloven-hooved herbavores. Most animals won't eat the nuisance thistles often found growing at mid-elevation in hard to reach areas. But the goats don't have any trouble getting to them and the best part is once goats ingest the plants, their digestive system renders the seeds useless. After the goats are finished eating the weeds, they move on, leaving favoured greenery behind.

The goats also take care of weeds in places close to water systems and other sensitive areas where chemicals can't be used.

The herd is scheduled to begin eating their way across the Dallas-Barnhartvale Nature Park this Thursday, July 31. After that, they'll appear at Kenna Cartwright Park to munch away on 45 ha that was previously treated. There are also plans to use the goats for weed control along city-owned portions of wetlands in Pineview Valley.

Those who want to get up close and pet one of the goats can find them just off Eliza Road while the animals are working in the Dallas-Barnhartvale Nature Park. Anyone with dogs must keep them on a leash in target areas.

Around 300 goats were brought to Kamloops as a mode of natural weed control in city parks, July 29, 2014.
Around 300 goats were brought to Kamloops as a mode of natural weed control in city parks, July 29, 2014.
Image Credit: City of Kamloops

Plumeless Thistle is just one of a number of noxious weeds goats in a natural control program are willing to eat, July 29, 2014.
Plumeless Thistle is just one of a number of noxious weeds goats in a natural control program are willing to eat, July 29, 2014.
Image Credit: Wikipedia

To contact a reporter for this story, email jstahn@infotelnews.ca, call 250-819-3723. To contact the managing editor, email Marshall Jones at mjones@infotelnews.ca or call 250-718-2724.

 

 

 

News from © InfoTel News Ltd, 2014
InfoTel News Ltd

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