Wondering what to do? Stop these pesky plants from invading your yard - InfoNews

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Wondering what to do? Stop these pesky plants from invading your yard

The Scotch thistle, an invasive plant.
Image Credit: PEXELS
April 14, 2020 - 6:30 AM

People been stuck at home for a while now, and may be running out of things to do.

Given the increasingly warm weather, however, new activities are literally springing up from the ground and it is the perfect time to get into the garden and do some planting and weeding.

The first step is identifying plants. The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society has provided an online resource to help gardeners at home identify and manage invasive plants.

The organization encourages the growth of native plants over invasive species, as the latter have ecological and health consequences.

Giant Hogweed, an invasive species.
Giant Hogweed, an invasive species.
Image Credit: Invasive Species Council of Metro Vancouver

For example, the Giant Hogweed has sap that contains toxins that cause severe dermatitis. The effects of this may include welts, rashes, scarring and blistering.

The Rush Skeletonweed, common in the Okanagan and Kootenay regions, can overgrow other native plants that serve as forage for wildstock and wildlife. Baby's Breath, although frequently used in bouquets, is another invasive species. Its deep root system allows it to outcompete native species for resources, and a single plant can produce thousands of seeds. 

Baby's Breath, an invasive species.
Baby's Breath, an invasive species.
Image Credit: The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society

This is why it's important to discover what's in your backyard.

The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society has guidelines posted on their website on how to properly dispose of invasive plants, as well as noxious weeds and the contaminated soil.

If you can't identify a plant in your yard, you can contact an expert by email here. If you spot an invasive species, you can report it via the Report-Invasives B.C. Mobile App.


To contact a reporter for this story, email Brie Welton or call (250) 819-3723 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.

We welcome your comments and opinions on our stories but play nice. We won't censor or delete comments unless they contain off-topic statements or links, unnecessary vulgarity, false facts, spam or obviously fake profiles. If you have any concerns about what you see in comments, email the editor in the link above. 

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