Surgeons can now practice on synthetic human tissue developed at UBC Okanagan

Dr. Guy Fradet (left) and professor Hadi Mohammadi.
Image Credit: UBC Okanagan

OKANAGAN - Synthetic heart valves, arteries and veins developed by a heart surgeon and a UBC Okanagan professor could allow surgeons to move away from practicing heart surgery on human and animal cadavers.

Inventor assistant professor Hadi Mohammadi said in press release the drawback to practicing on cadavers is they break down quickly without preservatives.

“This synthetic material doesn’t decompose and can’t be contaminated, meaning doctors can practice their technique almost anywhere,” Mohammadi said.

The synthetic human tissue feels like the real thing, more so than cadavers. Co-inventor Dr. Guy Fradet, head of cardiovascular surgery at Kelowna General Hospital, said patients can only benefit from making it easier for surgeons to practice.

The tissue is already being used by surgeons and medical residents at the hospital, Fradet said.

Next step is to develop a synthetic heart, the two men say, which could eliminate the need for cadaver tissue for practice purposes.

Their invention was recently featured in Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology.


To contact a reporter for this story, email John McDonald or call 250-808-0143 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.

We welcome your comments and opinions on our stories but play nice. We won't censor or delete comments unless they contain off-topic statements or links, unnecessary vulgarity, false facts, spam or obviously fake profiles. If you have any concerns about what you see in comments, email the editor in the link above. 


don-thompson
THOMPSON: Put New Orleans on your bucket list
  OPINION One of my favourite cities in the world is New Orleans. I never really lived there…but over the past 48 years - since I was 19 - I’ve probably been to the Big Easy more than 100 times. Some of the

Top News