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Protesters vow to continue B.C. fish farm protest amid court action

Kwakwaka'wakw nations and supporters protest fish farms in their traditional territories during a demonstration on Lekwungen Territory at the provincial legislature, in Victoria on Thursday, November 2, 2017. Marine Harvest Canada is asking the court for an injunction to remove First Nations protesters, of the Musgamagw Dzawada'enuxw nation, from one of its salmon farms near Vancouver Island.
Image Credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
November 12, 2017 - 9:00 PM

PORT HARDY, B.C. - First Nations protesters at a salmon farm off the northern coast of Vancouver Island are vowing to stay, despite court action aimed at removing them.

Molina Dawson with the Musgamagw Dzawada'enuxw says she began occupying the Midsummer Island farm with several other protesters more than two months ago because of concerns about the effect the facility is having on wild salmon in the region.

Marine Harvest Canada, which runs the farm, has filed an application for a court injunction to remove the protesters from the facility, located about 50 kilometres east of Port Hardy in the Broughton Archipelago.

Spokesman Ian Roberts says the company has delayed operations as long as possible in hopes of having discussions with the protesters.

However he says the company can no longer wait to continue work at the farm, citing concerns about the safety of the staff and the fish at the facility.

He says Marine Harvest has tried to speak with the protesters about their concerns, but have not yet been granted a meeting.

Dawson says no one from the company has come to talk to the protesters personally.

She says she would be open to a meeting, but what she really wants to see is the company remove its fish from the area.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2017
The Canadian Press

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