Naramata man just wants water to stop flooding his home

Naramata resident Lyle Armour of Winifred Road lost most of his retaining wall last spring after water began flowing along the Kettle Valley Rail trail above his property. The water stopped last summer, but began flowing again recently as temperatures rose above freezing.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED

PENTICTON - In the span of one year, a Naramata man has twice experienced once-in-a-lifetime water issues. 

It all started last spring when Winifred Road resident Lyle Armour lost most of his backyard retaining wall to a sudden influx of water coming off the Kettle Valley Railway right of way.

His basement also flooded after the sudden water flow began last March. Armour suspected the cause was related to a new subdivision being blasted out of the rock above his property.

Armour says nothing was done about the issue, despite pleas to the regional district, who told Armour that Recreation Sites and Trails B.C. was responsible for drainage issues in that specific area.

Armour says the water eventually stopped with the arrival of summer. But now the issues are back, even though Armour was told they were extremely rare.

“It was blamed on a wet spring," he says. "Last week, I could sink up to my calves in mud from water flowing through my property. It’s the same situation as last year."

Armour attended a public meeting held in Naramata last night, Jan. 30, regarding a zoning amendment to allow the expansion of a proposed subdivision above the Outlook Naramata Benchlands.

“My issue was simple in that the water they claimed was a ‘100-year occurrence’ is back in the same spot,” Armour says. "But it’s coming out of the bank the same way this year, and most of my retaining wall is gone."

Armour took photos and presented them at last night’s meeting.

“People were astounded by the amount of water already up there,” he says.

Armour says he contacted Recreation Sites and Trails B.C. Manager Tennessee Trent about the issue last Friday, Jan. 26, in addition to contacting regional district director for Naramata Karla Kozakevich.

“I have been told sites and trails are working on a response, and will get back to me as soon as possible,” Armour says. “I’m just trying to get the problem solved. I’m not asking for reparations, I want to stop the water from coming into my home."

Water has begun to flow along the Kettle Valley Rail trail above Naramata, similar to what took place last spring in what was supposed to be a unique, one-time event, claims Naramata resdient Lyle Armour, whose property is being affected by the runoff.
Water has begun to flow along the Kettle Valley Rail trail above Naramata, similar to what took place last spring in what was supposed to be a unique, one-time event, claims Naramata resdient Lyle Armour, whose property is being affected by the runoff.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED

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