Grizzly bear with white head spotted in Banff National Park by Calgary family | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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Grizzly bear with white head spotted in Banff National Park by Calgary family

A group of grizzly bears including a grizzly cub with a white head and a brown body are shown in this handout image in Banff National Park provided by Julia Turner Butterwick. Butterwick says they were driving through the park when they saw a mother with her two cubs on the side of the road.
Image Credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Julia Turner Butterwick
June 16, 2020 - 12:00 PM

BANFF, Alta. - A second rare grizzly bear has been spotted in Banff National Park.

Earlier this spring, an unusual white grizzly bear was revealed publicly after it was seen by a Banff family along the Trans-Canada Highway in the national park in Alberta.

Another family from Calgary is now sharing a photo of a grizzly cub with a white head and a brown body.

Julia Turner Butterwick says they were driving through the park when they saw a mother with two cubs on the side of the road, so they slowed down to take a photo.

She says her four-year-old son thought the bear looked like a panda.

Parks Canada was not immediately available for comment, but a spokeswoman says the agency will provide some information later today.

Concerns have already been raised about the all-white grizzly, a 3 1/2-year-old bear that has been nicknamed Nakoda by locals, because people are getting too close to it to try to get a photo.

That bear has been seen hanging out on the railway tracks and running across the Trans-Canada Highway in Yoho National Park, which is adjacent to Banff National Park on the British Columbia side of the boundary.

Parks Canada said earlier this week that observing wildlife in its natural habitat is a privilege that comes with responsibility.

"If you see wildlife near the highway, do not stop," the agency said.

"When visitors see wildlife in other areas, they should consider not stopping or, if safe to stop, always stay in their vehicles and give the animal space. Bears and other wildlife that become comfortable around people and roadsides are at greater risk of being struck by a vehicle."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 16, 2020
 

News from © The Canadian Press, 2020
The Canadian Press

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