Anarchist Mountain photographer captures images of bobcat in the wild | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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Anarchist Mountain photographer captures images of bobcat in the wild

Anarchist Mountain resident Ralph Palmer took this photo of a bobcat near his residence on New Year's day, Jan. 1, 2018.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED
January 08, 2018 - 5:30 PM

OSOYOOS - Ralph Palmer was seeking a life away from the daily non-stop hustle and grind of city life in retirement.

In a bid to live closer to nature, he and his wife traded the noisy din of 24 hour a day sirens in the city for the peace, tranquility and natural environment Anarchist Mountain offered.

The tradeoff paid dividends on New Year’s day, when Ralph was alerted to a bobcat sighting on a hill across the road from their house. He found a place where he could conceal himself but still view the cat.

“Fortunately, a lot of good wildlife photography is luck, and-or being in the right place at the right time,” Ralph said in an email. "The bobcat came closer and I was able to get some good pictures.... I’m not sure if the bobcat knew I was there. In some pictures, it looks like he’s staring right at me.”

Palmer says the wildlife seen on Anarchist is amazing.

“It’s such a welcome change from the concrete and asphalt environment we used to live in,” he says.

Penticton Conservation Officer Dave Cox says bobcat sightings are common this time of year, as the cats follow their prey down to the valley floor.

“I wouldn’t say they are a major issue, but every now and then in the winter months we get reports of them coming in and targeting house cats, feeding on the overabundant quail found in our municipalities, or getting into hobby farms for chickens, that sort of thing,” Cox says, adding the safety risk to the public with respect to a bobcat is low.

“They are a curious animal, but their prey sources profile is for small rodents and things like that,” he says, adding a bobcat can vary in size, ranging from six to 18 kilograms.

Cox couldn’t say whether bobcat sightings are cyclical on an annual basis or not, but in general it’s not uncommon for them to range the valley floor this time of year.

Cox says the same practices and principles apply to ensuring bobcats don’t get habituated to urban areas as applies to cougars and other animals of prey.

“Keep pets indoors at night, keep outdoor feeding to a minimum to reduce attractants, walk your animals on a leash,” he advises. “Don’t make them feel comfortable.”

The Conservation office removed two bobcats from Osoyoos last winter. So far in January, the Conservation office has received calls of bobcat sightings in Keremeos on Jan. 5, and in Penticton on Jan. 6.

Residents concerned about bobcat activity in their neighbourhood should call the RAPP line at: 1-877-952-7277.

Penticton conservation officer Dave Cox says it's not uncommon to see bobcats following their prey onto the valley bottom this time of year.
Penticton conservation officer Dave Cox says it's not uncommon to see bobcats following their prey onto the valley bottom this time of year.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED

To contact a reporter for this story, email Steve Arstad or call 250-488-3065 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.

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