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AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT

October 09, 2017 - 8:05 PM

Astros beat Red Sox 5-4 in Game 4, advance to ALCS

BOSTON (AP) — The Houston Astros poured back onto the field after advancing to their first AL Championship Series, posing for pictures with the Green Monster as a backdrop before a few players bellyflopped in the puddles in the infield dirt.

No matter, they were already soaked from celebratory beer and sparkling wine.

"Both teams were throwing their guys, and that's what you live for," Houston third baseman Alex Bregman said on Monday after Justin Verlander came out of the bullpen to beat Chris Sale in an aces-turned-relievers role reversal and helped the Astros eliminate the Red Sox in four games with a 5-4 victory.

"When we saw Verlander run to the 'pen we said, 'Our horse is on the mound, we need to win this game,'" said Bregman, who homered off Sale to tie it in the eighth before Josh Reddick's single gave the Astros the lead. "That's kind of the whole energy that he's brought since we brought him over here. He's brought an energy with him that, 'Hey, when he's out there, we're going to win.'"

Verlander, who was acquired for the playoff run after spending his first 13 seasons in Detroit, gave up the go-ahead homer to Andrew Benintendi — the first batter he faced — before shutting Boston down for the next 2 2/3 innings.

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At least 10 dead as fires rage in California wine country

SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — Wildfires whipped by powerful winds swept through California wine country Monday, killing at least 10 people, destroying 1,500 homes and businesses and sending thousands fleeing as flames raged unchecked through high-end resorts, grocery stores and tree-lined neighbourhoods.

The fires broke out nearly simultaneously and then exploded overnight, sending residents fleeing as embers rained down and flames raged around them. Two hospitals in Santa Rosa, the largest city in the region with 175,000 people, were forced to evacuate patients.

Later in the day, fires from ruptured gas lines dotted the smoky landscapes of blackened Santa Rosa hillsides. Fire trucks raced by smouldering roadside landscaping in search of higher priorities.

The flames were fickle in some corners of the city. One hillside home remained unscathed while a dozen surrounding it were destroyed.

One of the homes that was reduced to ash had a Mercedes Benz in the garage. Two cars parked across the street were untouched.

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Smoke, wildfires damage California's famed wine country

NAPA, Calif. (AP) — Workers in Northern California's renowned wine country picked through charred debris and plotted what to do with pricey grapes after wildfires swept through lush vineyards, destroying at least two wineries and damaging many others.

The wind-driven wildfires came as Napa and Sonoma counties were finishing highly anticipated harvests of wine grapes. Monday normally would have found workers picking and processing the ripe grapes to make chardonnay and other wines.

Instead, melted and blackened wine bottles decorated the ruined Signorello Estate winery in Napa Valley. People at Paradise Ridge Winery in Sonoma County posted photos of debris and haze, saying they were "heartbroken to share the news" that the winery had burned.

A maintenance worker watched and hoped for the best Monday as flames crept down a hillside by the Gundlach Bundschu Winery.

"It's right behind the main office. It's working its way down the hillside. What can I say? It's slowly working its way in," Tom Willis said.

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10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

1. TRUMP-CORKER FEUD DEEPENS GOP DIVISIONS

Republican Sen. Bob Corker's sharp criticism of the president — and Trump's rebuke — further undermine the GOP's ability to work on a major tax overhaul.

2. 'IT WAS LIKE ARMAGEDDON WAS ON'

Northern California resident Mike Turpen describes the raging wildfires that leave at least 10 dead and burn 1,500 homes and businesses across Sonoma's wine country.

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Texas Tech police officer killed, suspect in custody

LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Police apprehended a 19-year-old student accused of fatally shooting a Texas Tech University police officer at the campus police station Monday night.

University officials issued an alert saying the suspect was taken into custody and that the campus lockdown order had been lifted.

In an earlier statement, the university identified the suspect as Hollis Daniels.

University spokesman Chris Cook said that campus police made a student welfare check Monday evening and — upon entering the room — found evidence of drugs and drug paraphernalia. Officers then brought the suspect to the police station for standard debriefing.

While at the station, Cook said the suspect pulled out a gun and shot an officer in the head, killing him. The suspect then fled on foot before being apprehended a short time later.

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Sheriff: Shooter shot guard before he fired on concert-goers

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Law enforcement authorities on Monday said a hotel security guard was shot by the Las Vegas mass shooting's gunman before he opened fire on concert-goers.

Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo had previously said the guard was shot after gunman Stephen Paddock fired at the country music festival and that the guard's arrival in the hallway of the Mandalay Bay hotel may have caused Paddock to stop firing.

It was not immediately clear why the timeline of the shooting changed a week later and what the impact could be on the investigation.

On Monday, Lombardo said security guard Jesus Campos was in a hallway of the Mandalay Bay hotel responding to a report of an open door when he heard drilling from Stephen Craig Paddock's room.

Paddock, who had installed three cameras to monitor the approach to his suite, opened fire through the door, spraying 200 shots down the hall and wounding the guard, who alerted other security officials, Lombardo said.

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As Trump challenges Iran nuclear deal, those in Tehran worry

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — As U.S. President Donald Trump threatens the Iran nuclear deal, those living in Tehran feel that an accord they have yet to benefit from may already be doomed, hardening their skepticism about America.

Trump is set to deliver a speech on Iran this week in which he is expected to decline to certify Iran's compliance in the landmark 2015 agreement, referring it to Congress, and perhaps targeting the country's paramilitary Revolutionary Guard with new sanctions.

In the streets of the Iranian capital on Monday, The Associated Press spoke to a series of people about the nuclear deal: students and teachers, young and old, men in fashionable clothes and women in chadors.

Nearly all had the same concerns: Benefits from the 2015 accord have yet to reach Iran's 80 million people despite its government signing billion-dollar airplane deals. Inflation remains high, job opportunities stay low.

They also said Trump's threats fall in line with what Iranian leaders since the 1979 Islamic Revolution have warned: Americans can't be trusted. That feeling has unified hard-liners supporting Iran's clerically overseen government, as well as reformists seeking to change it.

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Corker's attacks on Trump highlight broader concerns in GOP

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bob Corker is hardly the only Republican lawmaker raising dark concerns about harm President Donald Trump might cause the U.S. and the world. But he's one of the few willing to air those worries in public.

Most GOP senators were silent Monday, a day after Corker charged that the White House was an "adult day care" and Trump could set the nation "on the path to World War III."

The only senator who publicly hinted at similar concerns was Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley, who said both Trump and Corker should "cool it."

"And I think it would help if the president would be the first to cool it," he added.

Tennessee's Corker, with his Twitter broadsides and an explosive weekend New York Times interview, gave voice to concerns that circulate widely on Capitol Hill about an unpredictable president whose tendency to personalize every issue creates risks for the GOP agenda. But Trump's enduring popularity with a segment of the GOP base serves as a political muzzle that keeps most elected Republicans from saying anything similar, even those who believe it to be true.

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Engineers: lives lost in Mexico quake could have been saved

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Warm lighting would enhance the wood floors' natural glow, the developer promised, so when all the custom lightbulbs burnt out, Anahi Abadia and her husband grudgingly drove to Home Depot to replenish supplies for their chic new flat in southern Mexico City.

They had just reached the register when the earthquake hit, shaking the store so fiercely the structure screeched. Minutes later, a text came in from their neighbour: The elegant apartment they had purchased only six months earlier had collapsed, rendering their new home a pile of crushed concrete.

They were among the fortunate: Two women working in their building and dozens more perished on Sept. 19 in structure failures that several prominent engineers now say could have been prevented. Nearly two-thirds of the 44 buildings that fell in Mexico City were designed with a construction method called flat slab — in which floors are supported only by concrete columns — now forbidden in parts of the United States, Chile and New Zealand according to data compiled by a team of structural engineers at Stanford University and obtained by The Associated Press.

Mexico City officials were widely lauded for tightening their building codes after thousands died in the 1985 earthquake. But they left out one crucial reform: a prohibition on the building technique that caused 61 per cent of the building collapses in last month's magnitude 7.1 quake, which killed 369 people and blanketed tree-lined avenues in rubble.

"I keep thinking about what would have happened if I had still been in bed that afternoon." said Abadia, 26, who was in her bedroom that morning recovering from thyroid cancer, dreaming of furnishing the home she and her husband moved into in March. "That was where we used to feel safe."

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Severino, Judge help Yanks top Indians 7-3 to force Game 5

NEW YORK (AP) — Luis Severino bounced back from his playoff debacle, slumping Aaron Judge delivered a big hit and the New York Yankees took advantage of shoddy defence by Cleveland to beat the Indians 7-3 Monday night and push their AL Division Series to a decisive Game 5.

Gary Sanchez homered and Judge laced an early two-run double for his only hit of the series to go with 12 strikeouts in 15 at-bats.

Cleveland starter Trevor Bauer struggled on three days' rest and was chased in the second inning. But it was on the wet Yankee Stadium field where the Indians really flopped, committing a season-high four errors that marked a franchise record for a post-season game and led to six unearned runs. The defending AL champions made only 76 errors all season, the lowest total in the league.

After preventing a three-game sweep with a 1-0 win Sunday night, the wild-card Yankees will start CC Sabathia in Game 5 at Cleveland on Wednesday. Indians ace Corey Kluber gets the ball in a rematch from Game 2, when he was hit hard by New York.

News from © The Associated Press, 2017
The Associated Press

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