The Latest: Walker warns of "blue wave" after Dallet win - InfoNews

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The Latest: Walker warns of "blue wave" after Dallet win

This photo taken March 26, 2018, shows Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates Rebecca Dallet, left, and Michael Michael Screnock appearing at the Milwaukee Bar Association, in Milwaukee, Wis. Voters braved cold rain and an early spring snowstorm Tuesday, April 3, 2018, to decide a Wisconsin Supreme Court race, the first statewide general election this year in the United States and the latest measure of voter attitudes heading into the November midterms. (Mark Hoffman /Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP)
April 03, 2018 - 8:19 PM

MADISON, Wis. - The Latest on the Wisconsin Supreme Court election (all times local):

10:18 p.m.

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker is warning of a possible Democratic wave in November after the liberal candidate for state Supreme Court thumped her conservative opponent.

Walker tweeted Tuesday night after Rebecca Dallet easily defeated Michael Screnock in the Supreme Court race.

Walker says the results show "we are at risk of a #BlueWave in WI." Walker is up for re-election to a third term in November.

He says, "Big government special interests flooded Wisconsin with distorted facts & misinformation. Next, they'll target me and work to undo our bold reforms."

Screnock was backed by the state chamber of commerce, National Rifle Association and state Republican Party. Dallet was supported by labour and teacher unions, most of the state's judges and a host of current and former Democratic officeholders.

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9:50 p.m.

The losing candidate for Wisconsin Supreme Court is blaming his defeat on liberal special interests that backed his opponent.

Milwaukee Circuit Judge Rebecca Dallet easily defeated conservative Sauk County Circuit Judge Michael Screnock. Democrats hailed the win as another sign of momentum for liberals this year. It's the first time a liberal candidate has won an open seat for Wisconsin Supreme Court since 1995.

Screnock says he was proud of his campaign "in spite of tremendous outside influence from liberal special interest groups that were willing to say and spend anything to elect their preferred candidate to the bench."

Both candidates were backed by partisans. Screnock was supported by the National Rifle Association, Republican Gov. Scott Walker and the state GOP, while Dallet was endorsed by former Democratic Vice-President Joe Biden and others.

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9:14 p.m.

Liberal Rebecca Dallet says her victory in Wisconsin's Supreme Court race over conservative Michael Screnock shows that voters are tired of special interests and want to have a "fair and independent court."

Other Democrats were quick to brand the win for Dallet a defeat for Republican Gov. Scott Walker and others in the GOP. Walker had endorsed Screnock.

Dallet tells The Associated Press that her win shows "people are tired of what's been going on in our state in terms of the money coming in to buy these elections and people spoke out tonight."

Her victory marks the first time since 1995 that a liberal candidate for Supreme Court won in a race where the seat is open.

The victory reduces conservative control of the court from 5-2 to 4-3.

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8:58 p.m.

Liberal Rebecca Dallet has easily defeated conservative Michael Screnock in a Wisconsin Supreme Court race seen as the latest bellwether of voter attitudes ahead of the November election.

Dallet's victory cuts conservative control of the state's highest court from 5-2 to 4-3. She also becomes the sixth woman on the seven-member court.

Conservative Justice Michael Gableman did not seek a second 10-year term.

Wisconsin's high court has become notably partisan in recent years even though it's nonpartisan in name.

Dallet, a Milwaukee County judge, drew strong Democratic support including an endorsement from former Vice-President Joe Biden.

Screnock, a Sauk County judge appointed and endorsed by Republican Gov. Scott Walker, had the backing of the National Rifle Association and the Wisconsin Republican Party.

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8:45 p.m.

The liberal candidate for Wisconsin Supreme Court is leading the conservative in early results of the first statewide general election this year in the United States and the latest measure of voter attitudes heading into the November midterms.

The election Tuesday pit conservative Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock, who was appointed by Republican Gov. Scott Walker, against liberal Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Rebecca Dallet. She drew support from former officials from Barack Obama's administration.

Dallet led by 16 points with 30 per cent of precincts reporting.

The race was nonpartisan in name only, with both sides eager to win the 10-year seat on a high court whose ideological split has been on public display in recent years. Michael Gableman, part of the court's current 5-2 conservative majority, did not seek a second term.

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8:10 p.m.

Polls have closed in Wisconsin where a race for the state Supreme Court is drawing national interest.

Both Democrats and Republicans invested heavily in the officially nonpartisan race, which is being viewed as a bellwether for how voters in the state that narrowly went for Donald Trump in 2016 are feeling heading into the November midterms. The race is the first statewide general election contest in the country this year.

Liberal Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Rebecca Dallet is facing conservative Sauk County Circuit Judge Michael Screnock. The winner will be elected to a 10-year term on a court currently controlled 5-2 by conservatives.

Former Vice-President Joe Biden and a host of other Democrats supported Dallet, while the state Republican Party and Gov. Scott Walker came out for Screnock.

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12:35 p.m.

A spring storm that's dumping snow across central Wisconsin isn't causing any known problems in an election for a new state Supreme Court justice.

Wisconsin Elections Commission spokesman Reid Magney said that as of midday Tuesday the commission was not aware of any access issues being caused by the snow storm.

Liberal candidate Rebecca Dallet is taking on conservative Michael Screnock for a 10-year term on the court. The race has become a partisan slugfest, with national Democrats spending money and giving endorsements in an effort to win the seat over the GOP-backed Screnock.

Turnout in Madison was strong in the morning as a cold rain fell across the reliably liberal capital city. Dane County Clerk Scott McDonell says 14 per cent of registered voters had cast ballots by 11 a.m., putting the county on pace for 50 per cent turnout. The statewide average is about 21 per cent.

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11:15 a.m.

Voters supporting the conservative candidate for Wisconsin Supreme Court say they cast their ballots with the Second Amendment in mind.

Tuesday's election between conservative Michael Screnock and liberal Rebecca Dallet has drawn national attention because its results can gauge voters' mood ahead of the midterms.

Sixty-year-old voter Michael George, of Brookfield, says he likes that Screnock supports gun rights because "that's what we need right now."

The National Rifle Association has endorsed Screnock.

Another Screnock supporter from Brookfield, 37-year-old Vincent Bortolotti, says he voted for Screnock for "his conservative values" and thinks the election results will show a favourable trend for state Republican candidates in the midterms.

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9:45 a.m.

Supporters of the liberal candidate for the Wisconsin Supreme Court say they are motivated to send a message to President Donald Trump and the National Rifle Association.

The NRA has endorsed conservative candidate Michael Screnock in Tuesday's election. Liberal candidate Rebecca Dallet was backed by former Vice-President Joe Biden and a host of other Democratic office holders.

Voter Doug Clawson, of Madison, says he voted for Dallet to send a message to Trump and Republicans that "we're going to take our country back."

Phil Ouellette (EW-let), also of Madison, says he was turned off by the NRA's backing of Screnock. Ouellette says "I don't want to support anyone who's backed by the NRA right now."

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8:45 a.m.

A spring snowstorm could be a player in Wisconsin's election day.

Voters statewide are deciding on a new Supreme Court justice, deciding whether to eliminate the state treasurer and taking on a host of local issues.

But getting to the polls won't be easy for some people. Up to 10 inches (25 centimetres) of snow is expected in the central part of the state. Dozens of schools are already cancelling classes.

Turnout is usually around 21 per cent for Wisconsin's spring election.

The Supreme Court election has been an expensive and highly partisan race, with Milwaukee Judge Rebecca Dallet backed by liberals and Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock, an appointee of Republican Gov. Scott Walker, favoured by conservatives.

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7:10 a.m.

Polls are open in the Wisconsin race for the state Supreme Court.

Voters are casting their ballots Tuesday in the race between Milwaukee County Judge Rebecca Dallet and Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock for a 10-year term on the high court.

Dallet drew the support of national Democrats, including former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and former Vice-President Joe Biden. Biden recorded a robocall for Dallet that went out on Monday night encouraging people to vote for her.

Screnock was the conservative choice — an appointee of Republican Gov. Scott Walker who had the backing of the state GOP and the state chamber of commerce.

Both candidates argue the other can't be trusted to serve as an independent voice on the state's highest court.

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12:03 a.m.

An expensive and openly partisan Wisconsin Supreme Court race is nearing an end.

Voters cast their ballots Tuesday in the race between Milwaukee County Judge Rebecca Dallet and Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock for a 10-year term on the high court.

The state's spring election is capping weeks of intense campaigning. Dallet drew the support of liberals including former Attorney General Eric Holder and former Vice-President Joe Biden.

Screnock was the conservative choice — an appointee of Republican Gov. Scott Walker who had the backing of the state GOP and the state chamber of commerce.

Both candidates argued the other couldn't be trusted to serve as an independent voice on the state's highest court.

News from © The Associated Press, 2018
The Associated Press

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