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iN PHOTOS: Solar eclipse draws huge crowd in Vernon

Anne Collinson and Sherri Field watch the eclipse through solar filter glasses provided by the Okanagan Science Centre.
August 21, 2017 - 12:15 PM

VERNON - Whether they were watching through pinhole projectors, telescopes or filtered glasses, people in the North Okanagan didn’t miss out on Monday’s, Aug. 21, partial solar eclipse.

Hundreds turned out at the Okanagan Science Centre and Polson Park to watch the moon block out the sun.

While the Science Centre ran out of eclipse glasses, no one went without a glimpse at the sun.

Russel Earnshaw peeks through the telescope to view the eclipse.
Russel Earnshaw peeks through the telescope to view the eclipse.

“Everybody is sharing their pin box viewers, sharing their glasses. Everyone is pitching in,” Jay Kohlman, who attended with his wife Sarah and their son Porter said.

The last solar eclipse that was visible from the Okanagan was in 1979.

Jade Kelly, 11, takes in the solar eclipse at Polson Park.
Jade Kelly, 11, takes in the solar eclipse at Polson Park.

“It doesn’t happen very often, that’s for sure,” Deb Gerhardt said.

She brought her granddaughters, Kayla and Ava, to witness the rare event.

Deb Gerhardt with granddaughters Kayla, 12, and Ava, 10.
Deb Gerhardt with granddaughters Kayla, 12, and Ava, 10.

Chris Johnson, visiting from Ontario, made a mad dash to the grocery store after learning the science centre was out of glasses. With an emptied cereal box, some tape and tinfoil, he was able to whip up a pretty decent viewer — and he didn’t waste the cereal either.

“That’ll be the snack for while we’re waiting,” he said.

Kevin Aschenmeier, with the Okanagan Science Centre, provided fun and fascinating facts about the solar eclipse.
Kevin Aschenmeier, with the Okanagan Science Centre, provided fun and fascinating facts about the solar eclipse.

Friends Annette Toop, Anne Collinson and Sherri Field showed great enthusiasm for the spectacle, which had a gradual darkening and cooling effect over the area.

Science teacher Annette Toop gazes up at the eclipse.
Science teacher Annette Toop gazes up at the eclipse.

“It’s very different seeing it in person than on the T.V.,” Toop, a high school science teacher said. “It’s extremely interesting. I wish all my students were here with me today.”

Blake Hanna takes an opportunity to view the eclipse through a telescope.
Blake Hanna takes an opportunity to view the eclipse through a telescope.

Hundreds came out to the Okanagan Science Centre to view the eclipse.
Hundreds came out to the Okanagan Science Centre to view the eclipse.

Viewers could track the progress on this piece of paper, set up by the innovative folks at the Okanagan Science Centre.
Viewers could track the progress on this piece of paper, set up by the innovative folks at the Okanagan Science Centre.

Nathan Anderson, 9, watches in awe as the moon passes in front of the sun.
Nathan Anderson, 9, watches in awe as the moon passes in front of the sun.

To contact a reporter for this story, email Charlotte Helston or call 250-309-5230 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.

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News from © InfoTel News Ltd, 2017
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