iN PHOTOS: Kamloops, Okanagan Halloween candy distributed by catapult, slide, for holiday | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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iN PHOTOS: Kamloops, Okanagan Halloween candy distributed by catapult, slide, for holiday

FILE PHOTO.
October 30, 2020 - 6:00 AM

Halloween wasn't cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but it will be looking a little different this year.

In the midst of the second wave of the virus, the B.C. Centre for Disease Control released recommendations for safe participation in Halloween festivities.

Kids and adults are encouraged to bring hand sanitizer and frequently sanitize their hands when trick-or-treating.

When it comes to handing out candy, some have opted for gloves or tongs, or tossing the treats from a safe distance.

We asked on our Facebook page how you will be handing out candy this year, and here are some of the most innovative responses:

Cat Samson's family constructed a cardboard Halloween candy slide.
Cat Samson's family constructed a cardboard Halloween candy slide.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Cat Samson

Cardboard was put to good use in this Penticton household. 

The kids put the candy in the chute opening from the deck, and the treats come out the bottom.
The kids put the candy in the chute opening from the deck, and the treats come out the bottom.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Cat Samson

Cat Samson and her family built a candy slide for this year's COVID-safe Halloween. The candy is placed at the top of the slide from the front porch and sent hurtling down to the children below.

This fortune teller booth was made using an old window pane, and cost Neil Terry $10 to build.
This fortune teller booth was made using an old window pane, and cost Neil Terry $10 to build.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Neil Terry

Penticton resident Neil Terry took a completely different approach, building a fortune teller booth from scratch, complete with a crystal ball. The front of the booth was made using an old wooden framed window. 

"There's a hole behind the crystal ball leading to a chute. Kids hold their buckets under the chute," Terry said. "Candy goes straight from the stores packaging to the buckets."

His wife Rachel came up with the idea after seeing different tips online for handing out candy while social distancing. The fortune teller booth only cost $10 to build. 

Kyle McKay made a Halloween candy slide using drain pipe.
Kyle McKay made a Halloween candy slide using drain pipe.

Kamloops resident Kyle McKay made a Halloween candy slide using drain pipe attached to the railing.

He attached a vacuum to the top, reversed the air flow and sends the candy shooting out the other end.

Dennis Clare made a candy chute using a ABS drain pipe for maximum slippery-ness.
Dennis Clare made a candy chute using a ABS drain pipe for maximum slippery-ness.

Not having a railing didn't stop Kamloops resident Dennis Clare from making his candy slide. He used an ABS drain pipe, which has a slippery interior. The pipe is propped up on a chair when not in use, and candy is placed at the top of the slide using tongs.

The treats shoot out the other end, into the trick-or-treaters' waiting bags. 

Julian Keresztesi constructed a candy catapult, otherwise known as a candypult.
Julian Keresztesi constructed a candy catapult, otherwise known as a candypult.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Julian Keresztesi

Kamloops resident Julian Keresztesi went the medieval route with his candy catapult. Treats are placed in the bucket attached to the arm, and sent flying as soon as you let it go. 

The candy goes far, so the kids will have some running to do if they want their treats. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by One Peak Creative (@onepeakcreative) on

A B.C.-based video production company had the same idea. One Peak Creative made a candy catapult and recorded a video about it in the style of a reality TV show.

In the video, they show how they made the catapult step by step.

Okanagan College students made Trick-Or-Treat Bowls using a 3D printer.
Okanagan College students made Trick-Or-Treat Bowls using a 3D printer.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Okanagan College

Three Okanagan College Mechanical Engineering students created a product for a COVID-safe Halloween using a 3D printer. They made Trick-Or-Treat Bowls, little containers with an attachment that fits on the end of any standard broom handle.

The idea is that candy can be placed in the bowl and extended to the treat-seeker, providing a socially distanced way to trick-or-treat.

The bowls come in pumpkin, witch hat or cauldron shapes, and they're all made of biodegradable plastic. 

The idea is that candy can be placed in the bowl and extended to the treat-seeker, providing a socially distanced way to trick-or-treat.
The idea is that candy can be placed in the bowl and extended to the treat-seeker, providing a socially distanced way to trick-or-treat.
Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Okanagan College

“With Halloween coming up, we wanted to provide something that could be fun for the kids while following Dr. Bonnie Henry’s guidelines,” Randy McFarland, one of the three students, said in a release.

McFarland, along with classmates Myles Derksen and Chase Seale run 3D Okanagan, a company specializing in small-scale 3D projects.

You can order a Trick-Or-Treat Bowl on their Facebook page here.

Are you getting COVID-creative this Halloween? Tell us about it in the comments, or if you have photos send them to news@infonews.ca.


To contact a reporter for this story, email Brie Welton or call (250) 819-3723 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.

We welcome your comments and opinions on our stories but play nice. We won't censor or delete comments unless they contain off-topic statements or links, unnecessary vulgarity, false facts, spam or obviously fake profiles. If you have any concerns about what you see in comments, email the editor in the link above. 

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