Winnipeg lawyer easing back to work after losing hand in letter bombing | iNFOnews

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Winnipeg lawyer easing back to work after losing hand in letter bombing

Winnipeg lawyer Maria Mitousis, who lost her hand in a letter bombing almost a year ago, says she doesn't look back on the past year with bitterness or regret, but rather with gratitude. Mitousis is seen at Winnipeg city hall during a ceremony on Friday, May 27, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chinta Puxley
May 27, 2016 - 11:44 AM

WINNIPEG - A Winnipeg lawyer who lost her hand in a letter bombing almost a year ago says she doesn't look back on the past year with bitterness or regret, but rather with gratitude.

The hospital visits have ended, many of the scars on her face and neck are healed but Maria Mitousis is still adjusting to life without her right hand.

"It's been a year of adjustment, that's for sure, but it's been a good year," Mitousis said Friday at a cheque presentation for a firefighters burn fund.

"Recovery has gone well and I have a lot to be grateful for. It's been a year of gratitude and a year of recovery."

Mitousis had just returned from an early-morning golf game last July and was opening her mail when the voice recorder she was sent exploded.

She was tended to by co-workers before paramedics arrived and rushed her to hospital where she underwent 10 hours of surgery. Police said she suffered "countless" injuries to her chest, face and thighs.

Guido Amsel was charged with attempted murder after three letter bombs were sent to his former wife's workplace and the offices of lawyers who had represented him and his wife in their divorce. Two bombs were safely disposed of, but one exploded and severely injured Mitousis.

More attempted murder charges were added earlier this year in a 2013 explosion at his ex-wife's home.

Amsel, who has professed his innocence, has been denied bail and is expected to go on trial next year.

Mitousis has since returned to the law office where she was injured and said she's slowly easing back into work over the summer.

"I'm really eager to get back and get back to normal," she said.

But "normal" now includes being recognized by people on the street and a continued outpouring of support from complete strangers.

"Lots of people say to me, 'I don't know that I would be able to be as positive as you are in this situation,'" Mitousis said. "But I'm convinced that people have that strength and you don't know that you do until you're faced with a situation.

"You'll surprise yourself, I think."

News from © The Canadian Press, 2016
The Canadian Press

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