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The Thursday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks up after symbolically ringing the gong at the Ho Chi Minh City Stock Exchange in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam Thursday November 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
November 09, 2017 - 2:38 PM

Highlights from the news file for Thursday, Nov. 9

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CANADA SAYS NO TPP ON THE HORIZON: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada won't be pressured into prematurely signing a deal on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The U.S. pulled out of the trade deal earlier this year and the 11 remaining signatories have been trying to salvage the deal. Trudeau told reporters at this week's APEC meetings in Vietnam that Canada won't sign a deal just because there is pressure to sign a deal.

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TRUDEAU TO MEET WITH MYANMAR'S LEADER: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is due to meet one on one with Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Friday. The meeting at the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation summit in Vietnam will be their first since a crackdown by Myanmar security forces that has forced hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims into exile since late August. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and the United Nations have said the violence against the Rohingya amounts to ethnic cleansing.

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FEDS MAKE CHANGES TO PARENTAL LEAVE: Starting early next month, new parents planning to take leave can spread their federal benefits over a longer period. The federal government's long-promised changes to parental leave rules take effect Dec. 3. Eligible new parents can take up to 18 months of employment insurance benefits after the birth of a child.

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SASK PREMIER ADMONISHES GOVERNOR GENERAL: Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall has weighed in on the debate regarding comments that Gov. Gen. Julie Payette made recently. Some people say a speech Payette made last week mocked people of faith and appeared to be critical of those who believe in creationism and horoscopes. Wall said on Thursday that Payette's comments don't meet the standard of conduct that comes with her position, saying it shows an "insensitivity to millions of Canadian who don't agree."

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COURTS DEAL WITH PATIENTS ON LIFE SUPPORT: Two Ontario court cases involving people deemed brain dead are generating debate on whether Canadian laws should clearly spell out what constitutes death. The two separate Ontario cases both involve religious objections to the concept of brain death. The lawyer representing families involved in the two cases contends the absence of a legal definition of death creates a grey area, particularly when it comes to issues such as religious accommodation. Some legal and medical experts say enshrining the definition of death in law wouldn't change much and they caution imposing a rigid definition could create issues down the road.

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MONTREAL SHOPPING MALL CRITICIZED FOR BRINGING SANTA OUT ON REMEMBRANCE DAY: Some people are calling for a Montreal shopping mall to reschedule a visit by Santa Claus about an hour before Remembrance Day services are to begin on Saturday. Some people have taken to social media to say Place Versailles is showing a terrible lack of judgement. The mall responded that it isn't logistically possible to have Santa come another day.

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N.S. GOVERNMENT AVOIDS ADDRESSING QUESTIONS ABOUT LACK OF DOCTOR FOR PREGNANT WOMAN: Nova Scotia Health Minister Randy Delorey says a woman halfway through her pregnancy who doesn't have a doctor is not the norm in the province. Kristen DeJong said on Thursday that she now has an appointment with an obstetrician at the end of the month, but only after months of phone calls to nurse practitioners, clinics and doctor's offices. Delorey said he was concerned about the number of times DeJong has tried to reach out for help.

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IMPERIAL TOBACCO WANTS CIGARETTES REGULATED THE SAME AS MARIJUANA: Imperial Tobacco is urging Canadian governments to use the same approach to regulate tobacco and nicotine as they plan to do for marijuana. CEO Jorge Araya told a business audience on Thursday that his company isn't looking for a cut in tobacco taxes. He says instead Imperial wants a competitive tax regime for other nicotine products such as e-cigarettes, which represent the future growth of his industry.

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TRUMP EXTENDS OLIVE BRANCH TO CHINA: U.S. President Donald Trump has set aside his blistering rhetoric in favour of friendly overtures to China as he winds down a two-day visit to Beijing. He's trying to flatter his hosts into establishing a more balanced trade relationship and doing more to blunt North Korea's nuclear ambitions. Trump is suggesting that if the U.S. and China jointly took on the world's problems, they "can solve almost all of them, and probably all of them."

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FAMILY OF MAN ACCUSED OF KILLING CHURCHGOERS SAYS HIS FAMILY IS IN SHOCK: The father of the man Texas authorities say killed more than two dozen people in a shooting at a small-town church says his family is grieving. Michael Kelley is the father of shooter Devin Patrick Kelley. He spoke to ABC News Wednesday from his Texas home. Authorities say the younger Kelley died from what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The father says he doesn't want the "media circus" surrounding the massacre to destroy "our lives, our grandchildren's lives."

News from © The Canadian Press, 2017
The Canadian Press

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