The Thursday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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The Thursday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrive to the Ise Grand Shrine (Ise Jingu) in Ise, Japan during the G7 Summit on Thursday, May 26, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
May 26, 2016 - 2:28 PM

Highlights from the news file for Thursday, May 26:

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BEWARE PROTECTIONISM, TRUDEAU SAYS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau warned his fellow G7 leaders to not get tracked in "demagoguery and protectionism." He extolled international trade at the G7 summit in Japan. He said trade-intensive industries pay 50 per cent higher wages. The G7 leaders largely focused their discussions on the global economy as the summit got underway.

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TRUDEAU PUSHES FOR STRONGER RULES ON HANDLING HOSTAGE TAKINGS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is making a push at the G7 summit that will likely broaden a previous agreement by the leaders to stop paying ransom for the release of kidnapped citizens. Peter Boehm, Trudeau's personal representative at the G7 summit, told reporters in Japan that there's a growing sense around the table that the problem isn't going away and by paying ransom you are just aiding and abetting the terrorists.

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AMBASSADOR PERSONALLY DEALS WITH SECURITY PROBLEM: Canada's ambassador to Ireland, best known for his role in fatally shooting an armed assailant inside the Parliament buildings in 2014, has once again stepped into an apparent security breach. Kevin Vickers, the former House of Commons sergeant-at-arms, tackled a protester Thursday in Dublin during a ceremony to remember British soldiers killed in the 1916 Easter Rising, which also claimed the lives of some 450 Irish republicans. A Canadian government spokesman says Vickers stopped a protester who ran up to the podium.

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AUDITORS FIND CONTRACTORS OVERCHARGED THE GOVERNMENT: Federal auditors have found about contractors either overcharged the government or made excessive profits. They say the excesses add up to $100 million. Documents obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act, show that more than 50 contracts reviewed by government officials revealed issues with, among others, Irving Shipbuilding and aerospace giant Bombardier.

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LIBERALS BEEF UP SHIPBUILDING SUPPORT: Public Services and Procurement Minister Judy Foote says she plans to double the staff working on the national shipbuilding strategy to address "growing pains" in the multibillion-dollar project. The extra public servants are among a handful of enhancements the Liberals are adding to a major project started by the Conservatives — one they say has been plagued by huge cost overruns. That's the only way to get the program on track so it can deliver new vessels to the Canadian Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Navy, Foote said.

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TRUMP LOCKS UP NOMINATION: Republican Donald Trump has reached the number of delegations needed to clinch his party's presidential nomination, and claimed Thursday that he has support from "almost everybody" in his party. He turned his guns on his likely Democratic presidential opponent, Hillary Clinton, who is still locked in a divisive primary contest. He gloated that she "can't close the deal."

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THOUSANDS OF MIGRANTS RESCUED AT SEA: More than 4,000 would-be refugees were rescued at sea Thursday in one of the busiest days of the Mediterranean migrant crisis. At least 20 died trying in their attempt to reach Europe. The death toll was likely to grow far higher, however, as the Libyan coast guard also reported two overturned boats between the coastal cities of Sabratha and Zwara. Only four bodies were found, raising fears that the rest of those on board had perished. Overall, the Italian coast guard said it had co-ordinated 22 separate rescue operations Thursday that saved more than 4,000 lives.

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HUNDREDS ATTACKED IN HOSPITALS: The World Health Organization says nearly 960 people have been killed worldwide in attacks on medical facilities in conflicts over the past two years. The report highlights an alarming disrespect for the protection of health care in war by both governments and armed groups. The study by the U.N. heath agency detailed 594 attacks on hospitals and clinics in the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere in 2014 and 2015 that killed 959 medics, support staff, patients and visitors and left over 1,500 injured.

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NICKELBACK SIGNS UP FOR WILDFIRE CONCERT: A June 29 concert to raise money for the victims of the Fort McMurray wildfire is boasting some of the best in Canadian music. Nickelback, Blue Rodeo, Corb Lund and Ian Tyson have all signed up. More than 80,000 people were forced from their homes on May 3 by the wildfire that ripped through the oilsands city.

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News from © The Canadian Press, 2016
The Canadian Press

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