B.C. government gauging interest in covering old Greyhound routes

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Greyhound bus service left B.C. a month ago and the government is looking for someone to fill the absence.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is gauging the interest of private sector operators, non-profit organizations, local governments, community agencies, Indigenous groups and other parties in providing bus services in B.C. The government is looking for groups to pick up the routes vacated when Greyhound left on Oct. 31.

The province wants eight former Greyhound B.C. routes filled, including Cache Creek to Kamloops on Highway 1, Kamloops to Valemount on Highway 5 and Highway 3 from Hope to Princeton.

It is also looking for coverage on Highways 5 and 16 from Valemount to the B.C.-Alberta boundary; Highway 2 from Dawson Creek to the provincial boundary; Highways 3 and 6 from Salmo to Creston; Highway 3 from Cranbrook to the B.C.-Alberta boundary; and Highway 7 from Fort Nelson to the B.C.-Yukon boundary.

Groups like Ebus have already started to cover former Greyhound routes in the province. The government says 83 per cent of the abandoned routes were covered by fast-tracking applications.

The deadline to express interest in covering the old routes in Jan. 15, 2019.


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