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2017 RBC Blue Water Project donates $10,000 for the prevention of aquatic invasive species

A boat propeller engulfed with quagga mussels.
Image Credit: Image Credit: Contributed/US National Parks Service
March 21, 2017 - 3:47 PM

The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen is pleased to announce that financial support from the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) Blue Water Project Grant Program has been received again in 2017.

The RBC has confirmed the $10,000 in grant funding will be made available to the Regional District in support of the Okanagan Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program addressing Quagga and Zebra Mussels.  Local RBC branch manager, Tim Gordon will present the cheque to Manfred Bauer -Regional District Vice-Chair on Wednesday, Mar 22nd, 10:30 am at the RBC Main Branch in Penticton.

Joining the Regional District will be Lisa Scott, Program Manager of the Okanagan and Similkameen Invasive Species Society (OASISS). OASISS will be utilizing these grant funds to further their ongoing outreach education. The RBC Blue Water Project Grant provided funding to the Regional District and OASISS in 2015 to create a unique, interactive, mobile educational trailer on the Quagga and Zebra Mussels. The trailer and OASISS staff travel region-wide throughout the summer to local events, beaches and marinas spreading the prevention message. “Having these additional funds to continue the interaction with all water users in the valley is vitally important” said Lisa, “This grant will help insure the trailer and prevention messaging keeps rolling.” 

“We’re very excited to see the RBC continue to support such an important prevention program,” said Regional District Engineering Supervisor Liisa Bloomfield.  “The Regional District and partner agencies are committed to help protect the Okanagan Lakes and waterways from invasive aquatics species like Quagga and Zebra Mussels.”

The introduction and invasion of Quagga and Zebra Mussels to bodies of water in the United States, eastern Canada and most recently in Montana has been devastating and costly. As these mussels reproduce, they degrade aquatic ecosystems to the point of collapse; cover infrastructure which hampers hydro power generation and a water purveyor’s ability to supply water to residents. The mussels infest beaches, cover boats and propellers, and foul bilges with layers of mussels and negatively affect tourism and community enjoyment; and cause a timely and costly imposition to boaters and recreational users by coating boats, propellers and foul bilges with layers of mussels and their carcasses.

News from © InfoTel News Ltd, 2017
InfoTel News Ltd

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