AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT

Trump unloads on Comey ahead of ex-FBI director's interview

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Sunday to unload on James Comey over his forthcoming memoir, calling him "slippery," suggesting he should be in jail and labeling him "the WORST FBI Director in history, by far!"

Trump fired off a series of tweets ahead of Comey's first interview on the book, which offers his version of the events surrounding his firing as FBI director by Trump and the investigations into Russian election meddling and Hillary Clinton's email practices. The interview will air Sunday night on ABC.

In an excerpt shown Saturday, Comey said his belief that Clinton would beat Trump in the 2016 presidential election was a factor in his decision to disclose the investigation into her emails. Trump seized on that, saying Comey "was making decisions based on the fact that he thought she was going to win, and he wanted a job. Slimeball!"

Comey's disclosure shortly before the election that the FBI had reopened its investigation into her email use enraged Democrats. After Clinton's loss, many Democrats blamed Comey, and Clinton herself has said it hurt her election prospects.

Trump on Sunday pushed back again against Comey's claims that Trump sought his loyalty, saying, "I hardly even knew this guy. Just another of his many lies." He questioned Comey's intelligence and place in history, writing, "Slippery James Comey, a man who always ends up badly and out of whack (he is not smart!), will go down as the WORST FBI Director in history, by far!"

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10 Things to Know for Monday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Monday:

1. WHY COMEY SAYS HE DISCLOSED CLINTON EMAIL PROBE

As the former FBI chief begins a book tour, he says he announced the investigation into the Democratic candidate's emails during 2016 White House race because he didn't want to hide it from voters.

2. US AIMS NEW SANCTIONS AT RUSSIA

The sanctions are designed to put more pressure on Russia for enabling Bashar Assad's government, says U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley.

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Spokesman: Former first lady Barbara Bush in failing health

HOUSTON (AP) — Former first lady Barbara Bush is in "failing health" and won't seek additional medical treatment, a Bush family spokesman said Sunday.

"Following a recent series of hospitalizations, and after consulting her family and doctors, Mrs. Bush, now age 92, has decided not to seek additional medical treatment and will instead focus on comfort care," spokesman Jim McGrath said in a news release.

McGrath did not elaborate as to the nature of Bush's health problems. She has been treated for decades for Graves' disease, which is a thyroid condition, had heart surgery in 2009 for a severe narrowing of her main heart valve and was hospitalized a year before that for surgery on a perforated ulcer.

"It will not surprise those who know her thatBarbara Bush has been a rock in the face of her failing health, worrying not for herself — thanks to her abiding faith — but for others," McGrath said. "She is surrounded by a family she adores, and appreciates the many kind messages and especially the prayers she is receiving."

Bush, who is at home in Houston, is one of only two first ladies who was also the mother of a president. The other was Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, the nation's second president, and mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth president.

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US to hit Russia with new sanctions for aiding Syria's Assad

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday defended his use of the phrase "Mission Accomplished" to describe a U.S.-led missile attack on Syria's chemical weapons program, even as his aides stressed continuing U.S. troop involvement and plans for new economic sanctions against Russia for enabling the government of Bashar Assad.

Stepping up the pressure on Syria's president, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley indicated the sanctions to be announced Monday would be aimed at sending a message to Russia, which she said has blocked six attempts by the U.N. Security Council to make it easier to investigate the use of chemical weapons.

"Everyone is going to feel it at this point," Haley said, warning of consequences for Assad's foreign allies.

"The international community will not allow chemical weapons to come back into our everyday life," she said. "The fact he was making this more normal and that Russia was covering this up, all that has got to stop."

Trump tweeted Sunday that the strike was "perfectly carried out" and that "the only way the Fake News Media could demean was by my use of the term "Mission Accomplished."" He added that he knew the media would "seize" on the phrase, but said it should be used often. "It is such a great Military term, it should be brought back," he wrote.

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In age of #MeToo, can there be forgiveness, second chances?

If a man abuses his co-workers and apologizes, should he be forgiven? What about a man who sexually assaults a stranger asleep in bed? Is redemption possible?

Last week, Tom Ashbrook, who was fired as host of the popular National Public Radio program "On Point," asked in a column in The Boston Globe if there was a way back after being fired in February for creating an "abusive work environment." Investigators for his employer, Boston radio station WBUR, cleared him of sexual misconduct allegations.

"My behaviour was offensive and overbearing to some," Ashbrook wrote, going on to ask: "Is there room for redemption and rebirth, in our time of Google trails and hashtag headlines?"

There should be, say many experts who study issues surrounding sexual abuse. Forgiveness must be possible if society wants to reduce instances of sexual misconduct, but experts say, it will take work and willingness to change from both the perpetrators and society at large.

Many of the apologies men have made after being accused of misconduct during the #MeToo movement have fallen short of what's needed for redemption: Think of Harvey Weinstein, whose apology after a New York Times report in October alleging decades of sexual misconduct included a promise to fight the National Rifle Association and an excuse blaming the culture in the 1960s and 1970s.

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Spring storm moves east after blanketing central US in snow

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota residents slogged through a mid-April storm Sunday that dumped 2 feet (half a meter) of snow on parts of the Upper Midwest, coated roads with ice and battered areas farther south with powerful winds and tornadoes before plowing toward the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic U.S.

The storm system prompted Enbridge Energy to temporarily shutter twin oil and gas pipelines in Michigan that may have been recently damaged by a ship anchor strike.

The Line 5 pipelines were temporarily shuttered Sunday afternoon due to a power outage at Enbridge's terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, Enbridge spokesman Ryan Duffy told The Detroit News. Enbridge decided to shut down the twin pipelines until weather conditions improve in the Straits of Mackinac, which links Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, Duffy said.

At least four deaths were blamed on the weather.

At Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, where more than 13 inches (33 centimetres) of snow had fallen, 230 flights were cancelled Sunday. Two runways were open, but winds were still strong and planes were being de-iced, spokesman Patrick Hogan said. On Saturday, the storm caused the cancellation of nearly 470 flights at the airport.

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Boston marks 5 years since marathon attack with tributes

BOSTON (AP) — The bells of Old South Church in Boston rang at 2:49 p.m. to commemorate a citywide moment of silence in honour of Boston Marathon bombing survivors and victims

It was an emotional moment in a day filled with service projects and ceremonies to remember those impacted by the deadly bombings five years ago.

Boston began the anniversary of the attacks Sunday with Mayor Marty Walsh and Gov. Charlie Baker laying wreaths early in the morning at the spots along downtown Boylston Street where two bombs killed three spectators and maimed more than 260 others April 15, 2013.

Both addressed families and survivors at a private ceremony inside the Boston Public Library.

"On April 15, 2013, our city changed forever but over the last five years, we have reclaimed hope. We have reclaimed the finish line and Boston has emerged with a new strength, a resilience rooted in love," Walsh said.

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After injury, Underwood returns to stage in strong form

Carrie Underwood made her first television appearance since injuring her face in strong form at the 2018 Academy of Country Music Awards, owning the stage with her powerhouse vocals.

Underwood, in a glittery dress, returned to the stage Sunday like an A-List veteran when she performed her new song, "Cry Pretty," earning a rousing, and long, standing ovation from the Las Vegas audience. Underwood injured her face and wrist last year due to a fall at her home.

Following the performance, she immediately won vocal event of the year for the dance-infused country song, "The Fighter," with Keith Urban.

"Thank you for having me," Underwood said to Urban onstage. "I am still kind of shaking right now," she added, appearing teary-eyed.

Sunday also marked a memorable day for Chris Stapleton: His wife gave birth to twin boys, he celebrated his 40th birthday and he won album of the year at the ACMs.

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Victor-y: Oladipo scores 32 as Pacers stun LeBron, Cavs

CLEVELAND (AP) — LeBron James figured he had experienced everything in 12 postseasons.

Turns out, there was something new.

Victor Oladipo scored 32 points and Indiana outplayed Cleveland from the start while pulling off a stunning 98-80 victory Sunday in the series opener, handing James and the Cavaliers' their first loss in the opening round in eight years.

It also was the first playoff-opening loss for James, who came in 12-0 in Game 1s and didn't realize he had been perfect starting the post-season.

"Is it?" James said. "I've never lost a game in the first round before in my career?

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Trump: All lawyers 'deflated' by FBI raid on Michael Cohen

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Sunday that all lawyers are now "deflated and concerned" by the FBI raid on his personal attorney Michael Cohen, who is under criminal investigation for personal business dealings.

"Attorney Client privilege is now a thing of the past," he tweeted. "I have many (too many!) lawyers and they are probably wondering when their offices, and even homes, are going to be raided with everything, including their phones and computers, taken. All lawyers are deflated and concerned!"

The raid carried out last Monday at Cohen's apartment, hotel room, office and safety deposit box sought bank records, records on Cohen's dealing in the taxi industry, Cohen's communications with the Trump campaign and information on payments he made in 2016 to former Playboy model Karen McDougal and to porn actress Stormy Daniels, people familiar with the investigation told The Associated Press.

One of Trump's lawyers, Joanna Hendon, filed papers late Sunday asking a federal judge to block prosecutors from studying material seized in the raid until Cohen and the president have both had a chance to review those materials and argue which are subject to attorney-client privilege.

"Fairness and justice — as well as the appearance of fairness and justice — require that, before they are turned over to the Investigative Team, the seized materials relating to the President must be reviewed by the only person who is truly motivated to ensure that the privilege is properly invoked and applied: the privilege-holder himself, the President," Hendon wrote.


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GEORGE: When economic imperatives clash with the military-industrial apparatus
  OPINION As citizens, we expect a lot from our governments. We expect them to provide wise guidance for our economy, prudent shepherding of our environment, and protection from violence both foreign and domestic.

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