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AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EST

Original Publication Date December 04, 2021 - 9:06 PM

Bob Dole, a man of war, power, zingers and denied ambition

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole willed himself to walk again after paralyzing war wounds, ran for Congress with a right arm too damaged to shake hands, and rose through the Senate ranks to become a long-serving Republican leader and tough and tireless champion of his party.

He embodied flinty determination to succeed.

Yet Dole, who died Sunday at age 98, was most famous for the times he came up short.

He was the vice presidential running mate in President Gerald Ford’s post-Watergate loss and he sought the presidency himself three times. He came closest in his final race, securing the 1996 Republican nomination only to be steamrolled by President Bill Clinton’s reelection machine.

Dole later said he had come to appreciate the defeats as well as the victories: “They are parts of the same picture — the picture of a full life.”

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Memorable moments from Bob Dole's life and political career

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole’s political career began in 1950 with election to the Kansas Legislature and officially ended nearly five decades later, one step short of the White House. In retirement, Dole kept working into his 90s for the causes he cherished.

A look at some of the moments from a life in politics:

As a college student, Dole had planned to be a doctor. World War II changed his life’s direction. He nearly died from injuries sustained as a second lieutenant leading an assault on German forces. After three years of surgeries and physical therapy, Dole regained the ability to dress, eat and walk. But he never recovered use of his right hand and arm, and much of his left hand was numb. Dole returned to college, earned a law degree and was elected county attorney. “The theory was, if I can’t use my hands, I can use my head,” he later recalled.

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Dole was a senator already known for his biting remarks when President Gerald Ford chose him as his running mate. Dole shocked viewers of the 1976 vice presidential debate by declaring the wars of the 20th century so far — the two world wars, Korea and Vietnam — to be “Democrat wars” that had killed or wounded 1.6 million Americans. “Senator Dole has richly earned his reputation as a hatchet man tonight,” his Democratic opponent, Minnesota Sen. Walter Mondale, responded.

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Reaction to Bob Dole's death from US dignitaries, veterans

U.S. dignitaries and military veterans are mourning former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, a World War II veteran and former Republican presidential candidate who served in Congress for 36 years. Dole, who had stage 4 lung cancer, died Sunday at age 98, according to his wife, Elizabeth.

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“Bob was an American statesman like few in our history. A war hero and among the greatest of the Greatest Generation. And to me, he was also a friend whom I could look to for trusted guidance, or a humorous line at just the right moment to settle frayed nerves. I will miss my friend. But I am grateful for the times we shared, and for the friendship Jill and I and our family have built with Liddy and the entire Dole family. ... He had an unerring sense of integrity and honor. May God bless him, and may our nation draw upon his legacy of decency, dignity, good humor, and patriotism for all time.” — President Joe Biden, who served with Dole in the Senate.

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“Laura and I are saddened by the passing of a great patriot, Senator Bob Dole. This good man represented the finest of American values. He defended them in uniform during World War II. He advanced them in the United States Senate. And he lived them out as a father, husband, and friend. Our entire family benefitted from that friendship, including my father. I will always remember Bob’s salute to my late dad at the Capitol, and now we Bushes salute Bob and give thanks for his life of principled service." — Former President George W. Bush, speaking of Dole's tribute to former President George H.W. Bush.

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Lawyer: Artist didn't know Michigan parents stayed in studio

A Detroit-area artist whose studio was where the parents of the Oxford High School student charged in a deadly shooting were found by police is cooperating with authorities and didn’t know the couple had stayed overnight, his attorney said Sunday.

James and Jennifer Crumbley, who face involuntary manslaughter counts, were found early Saturday inside a Detroit commercial building. The couple's attorneys have said they didn't intend to flee, countering authorities who accused them of eluding capture for their alleged role in a school shooting that left four students dead. Their 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley, has been charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

The couple went to artist Andrzej Sikora's studio inside the downtown building Friday morning, but the artist was unaware of the charges against the couple or that they stayed after he left for the day, according to attorney Clarence Dass. He said Sikora had a "friendly relationship"' with the Crumbleys but declined to give details, citing an active investigation.

Dass said when the artist awoke Saturday and heard news of authorities taking the couple into custody, he voluntarily contacted authorities. Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon.

“There was a lot of confusion and the Crumbleys went to him for safety. He didn’t know about the charges,” Dass said. “They were there in the daytime. He left in the early evening. He didn’t even know they were still there.”

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Lawyer: Chris Cuomo accuser was disgusted by 'hypocrisy'

NEW YORK (AP) — A woman who lodged a sexual harassment allegation against former CNN anchor Chris Cuomo was “disgusted” by what she saw as his hypocrisy and attempts to discredit women who made similar allegations against his brother, her lawyer said Sunday.

The woman's complaint became known shortly after CNN fired the “Cuomo Prime Time” anchor Saturday night. Chris Cuomo had been criticized for breaching journalistic ethics by trying to help his brother, former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, beat his own harassment charges.

The woman, who has chosen to remain anonymous, took her allegations against Chris Cuomo to CNN on Wednesday through her lawyer, Debra Katz.

Katz did not give any specifics about the alleged behavior, believed to have occurred before Cuomo joined CNN in 2013. Prior to that, he worked at ABC News.

Chris Cuomo, through a spokesman, said the charges were untrue. “If the goal in making these false and unvetted accusations was to see Mr. Cuomo punished by CNN, that may explain his unwarranted termination,” the spokesman said.

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Fauci says early reports encouraging about omicron variant

U.S. health officials said Sunday that while the omicron variant of the coronavirus is rapidly spreading throughout the country, early indications suggest it may be less dangerous than delta, which continues to drive a surge of hospitalizations.

President Joe Biden's chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told CNN's “State of the Union” that scientists need more information before drawing conclusions about omicron's severity.

Reports from South Africa, where it emerged and is becoming the dominant strain, suggest that hospitalization rates have not increased alarmingly.

“Thus far, it does not look like there’s a great degree of severity to it,” Fauci said. “But we have really got to be careful before we make any determinations that it is less severe or it really doesn’t cause any severe illness, comparable to delta.”

Fauci said the Biden administration is considering lifting travel restrictions against noncitizens entering the United States from several African countries. They were imposed as the omicron variant exploded in the region, but U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has blasted such measures as “travel apartheid."

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Cruise ship with COVID-19 infections arrives in New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Norwegian Cruise Line ship with at least 10 passengers and crew members infected with COVID-19 docked Sunday in New Orleans, where health officials said they were trying to disembark people without worsening the spread of the coronavirus illness.

Local news outlets in New Orleans confirmed the Norwegian Breakaway had arrived in the city. The ship departed New Orleans on Nov. 28. The Louisiana Department of Health said in a late Saturday news release that over the past week, the ship made stops in Belize, Honduras and Mexico.

Norwegian Cruise Line issued a statement that confirmed a “handful of COVID-19 cases among guests and crew.” The company said all of the identified cases involved people without symptoms of the illness.

Norwegian said it requires all passengers and crew members to have been vaccinated against the coronavirus prior to departure.

“We are testing all individuals on Norwegian Breakaway prior to disembarkation, as well as providing post-exposure and quarantine public health guidance by the (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),” the company's statement said. “Any guests who have tested positive for COVID-19 will travel by personal vehicle to their personal residence or self-isolate in accommodations provided by the company.”

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O'Neil, Hodges, Miñoso, Kaat, Oliva, Fowler get baseball HOF

Buck O'Neil never uttered a single word of bitterness or regret about not being elected to the baseball Hall of Fame. Till the end, he urged those who loved and rooted for him to do the same.

Now, long after a near miss that left many wondering if he'd ever make it, they can rejoice.

O’Neil, a champion of Black ballplayers during a monumental, eight-decade career on and off the field, joined Gil Hodges, Minnie Miñoso and three others in getting chosen for the Hall of Fame on Sunday.

Former Minnesota Twins teammates Tony Oliva and Jim Kaat also were elected along with Bud Fowler by a pair of veterans committees.

“Jubilation,” said Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, that O’Neil helped create.

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Kennedy Center Honors back once more, Biden attends

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Kennedy Center Honors is returning to tradition this year.

The lifetime achievement awards for artistic excellence will be presented Sunday night in a gala at the Kennedy Center's main opera house after the coronavirus pandemic forced delays and major changes to last year's plans.

Honorees include Motown Records creator Berry Gordy, “Saturday Night Live” mastermind Lorne Michaels, actress-singer Bette Midler, opera singer Justino Diaz and folk music legend Joni Mitchell.

This year's event also represents a return to political normalcy, with President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden attending. The Democrat is the first president to be at the Kennedy Center Honors since 2016.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump skipped the show the first three years he was in office after several of the artists honored in 2017, his first year in office, threatened to boycott a White House reception if the Republican participated.

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Skiing Santas back to shredding Maine slopes for charity

NEWRY, Maine (AP) — Santa is back to “sleighing” it on the ski slope.

More than 230 skiing and snowboarding Kris Kringles took to a western Maine resort on Sunday to raise money for charity.

The jolly ol’ St. Nicks took a break last year because of the global pandemic. But they returned to kick off the ski season in full holiday garb, including white beards, red hats and red outfits.

A sea of red Santa suits descended the mountain, carving wide turns as their beards fluttered in the icy wind. At least one green-costumed Grinch snuck his way into the mix, disguised in Santa’s coat and hat.

The event took place in the western Maine town of Newry, home to the Sunday River Ski Resort, the state’s busiest.

News from © The Associated Press, 2021
The Associated Press

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