The Latest: Washington housing discrimination bill advances - InfoNews

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The Latest: Washington housing discrimination bill advances

In this Monday, March 5, 2018, photo, Patrice E., right, who declined to provide her last name, embraces her friend Ronda Rohde inside a church building where they are among the two-dozen women living in their vehicles in the adjacent parking lot in Kirkland, Wash. Some of the obstacles faced by the women in finding permanent housing may soon become illegal in Washington state, where legislators are advancing a bill that would prohibit landlords from turning away tenants who rely on Section 8 vouchers, Social Security or veterans benefits. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
March 06, 2018 - 5:11 PM

SEATTLE - The Latest on a housing discrimination measure before Washington lawmakers. (all times local):

5 p.m.

Legislators in Washington state have passed a bill that bars landlords from turning away tenants who rely on Social Security income, veterans benefits and federally funded Section 8 vouchers that help low-income people pay rent.

The measure that passed Tuesday is one of several efforts by politicians and low-income housing advocates aimed at curbing one of the highest homeless rates in the nation. It now goes to Gov. Jay Inslee for his signature.

The National Conference of State Legislatures says 11 other states and Washington, D.C., have enacted similar laws.

While Washington boasts one of the country's fastest-growing economies, the flip side is a housing market where rents have surged and vacancy rates are the country's lowest.

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8 a.m.

Washington state lawmakers are advancing a measure that would prohibit landlords from turning away tenants that rely on federal housing assistance, Social Security income and veterans benefits.

It's one of several efforts by politicians and low-income housing advocates aimed at curbing one of the highest homeless rates in the nation.

While Washington boasts one of the country's fastest-growing economies, the flip side is a housing market where rents have surged and vacancy rates are the country's lowest.

The bill passed both chambers, but changes made in the Senate must be approved in the House before the bill goes to Gov. Jay Inslee.

The National Conference of State Legislatures says 11 other states and Washington D.C. have enacted similar laws.

News from © The Associated Press, 2018
The Associated Press

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