The Latest: District says 58 per cent of Denver teachers out - InfoNews

Current Conditions

Mostly Cloudy
-2.0°C

The Latest: District says 58 per cent of Denver teachers out

Liz Myers, center, a teacher at High Tech Elementary School, joins a chant during a rally for striking Denver Public Schools instructors in Civic Center Park Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Denver. The strike, which is in its second day, is the first for Denver's teachers since 1994. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
February 13, 2019 - 3:19 PM

DENVER - The Latest on the Denver teachers' strike (all times local):

4:15 p.m.

The Denver school district says 58 per cent of teachers did not report for work during the third day of an educator strike over pay.

The total issued Wednesday by Denver Public Schools is consistent with its reports from the strike's first two days. About 4,700 teachers work in the district.

Teachers again picketed outside schools before marching en masse to the district's central office in downtown Denver, carrying signs and chanting.

Teachers and school officials have said they are hopeful they can reach a deal to end the walkout. Negotiations continued into the evening on Wednesday.

Schools staffed by administrators and substitute teachers have remained open but classes for 5,000 pre-school children were cancelled. There are 71,000 students in district-run schools.

____

2:10 p.m.

Denver school administrators and teachers are making progress as they try to end a three-day strike but still must address a major hurdle regarding educators' pay.

The bargaining team representing teachers agreed Wednesday afternoon with much of the school district's proposal regarding how teachers can increase their pay based on experience, education and training over time.

There is still no agreement yet on a top district priority: Bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools the district prioritizes.

Teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries.

Teachers said retention data from those schools shows that bonuses alone will not help keep educators there. They suggested smaller class sizes, improved leadership and a focus on student services will have a larger impact.

____

10:50 a.m.

Denver school administrators and teachers have returned to the bargaining table as they try to end a strike over pay.

Teachers remained on the picket lines for a third day as the negotiations got underway Wednesday morning.

Teachers wearing red filled the negotiating room at Denver's main library and left gifts of food and drinks for members of the union's bargaining team. The audience clapped and cheered as the union representatives entered the room.

Initial discussion on Wednesday focused on how teachers can advance in pay based on experience, education and training.

The two sides also disagree on pay increases and bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools the district prioritizes. Teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries.

____

9:30 a.m.

Denver teachers are on strike for a third day but teachers and school officials say they are hopeful they can reach a deal to end the walkout.

Negotiations are set to resume Wednesday morning following talks that lasted into the night on Tuesday.

Union president Henry Roman (Ro-MAHN') and superintendent Susana Cordova say in a statement the proposals both sides exchanged have moved both sides closer together.

Teachers are striking to raise their pay and reduce their reliance on earning bonus pay.

One of the main sticking points is the size of bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools the district prioritizes.

____

11 p.m.

Denver teachers are set to extend their strike into a third day after negotiations with district leaders ended Tuesday night without a deal.

Tuesday's talks came a day after more than half of the city's teachers walked off the job amid a pay dispute. The negotiations, which are set to resume Wednesday, began with discussions over changing Denver's pay system to more closely resemble those in other districts that make it easier for teachers to advance in pay based on experience, education and training.

The two sides also disagree on pay increases and bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools the district prioritizes. Teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries.

The teachers' union and district leaders alternated meeting publicly and then took time to discuss proposals in private.

News from © The Associated Press, 2019
The Associated Press

  • Popular kamloops News
  • Comments
View Site in: Desktop | Mobile