The Latest: FEMA says 'a lot wrong' with PR contract

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., left, talks with Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., right, during a Senate Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, on the federal response to the 2017 hurricane season. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON - The Latest on FEMA testimony (all times local):

12:35 p.m.

The head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency says there was "a lot wrong" with a $300 million no-bid contract awarded to a tiny Montana company to aid Puerto Rico.

FEMA Administrator Brock Long tells Congress that FEMA officials only learned about the contract awarded to Whitefish Energy Holdings after it had been signed by the board of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority.

The head of the troubled utility said Sunday he would seek to cancel the contract, amid scrutiny from multiple federal and congressional investigations.

Long said: "No lawyer inside FEMA would ever have agreed to some of the language in that contract."

___

11:54 a.m.

The head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency says the U.S. is spending more than $200 million each day on the response to three major hurricanes and huge wildfires.

FEMA Administrator Brock Long told a Senate oversight committee Tuesday the challenge presented by hurricanes Irma, Harvey and Maria is unprecedented in the history of his agency. He also noted costs from the recent wild fires in California, which Long called the worst devastation he has ever seen.

Long thanked the legislators for the $52 billion in emergency relief allocated so far, but said recovering from the recent spate of disasters will be tremendously expensive.

Long said he also needs additional legal authority from Congress to build the power grid in Puerto Rico back better than it was before.


Mom's who have lost kids to overdose have been mailing photos to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as part of a new project called Somebody's Someone.
Trudeau getting hundreds of photos from Interior moms whose children died from overdoses
Hundreds of black-bordered envelopes adorned with purple hearts were sent to the Prime Minister Justin Trudeau this week from moms hurt by overdose deaths. Inside the envelopes are photos of family members who have died since the start of t

Top News