Stranded deer rescued from frozen lake near Kamloops - InfoNews

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Stranded deer rescued from frozen lake near Kamloops

Mike Ritcey and a fellow member of Kamloops Search and Rescue rescued a deer from the ice on Tunkwa Lake, Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017.
Image Credit: FACEBOOK
December 08, 2017 - 2:18 PM

KAMLOOPS, B.C. - Two members of a Kamloops search crew carried out an unusual rescue this week after they received a call about a deer stranded on an ice-covered lake.

Mike Ritcey and a fellow member of Kamloops Search and Rescue received a call from a woman who spotted the deer on Tunkwa Lake, about 80 kilometres west of Kamloops.

The pair sprang into action and decided to personally help the deer, although it wasn't an official Kamloops Search and Rescue operation.

Photos show the deer with a scarf wrapped around its eyes while it lies in a plastic sled, and then sitting up beside its rescuers.

The B.C. Conservation Service says an officer received a call about the deer on Sunday, Dec. 3, but due to a miscommunication, he thought the complaint had been dealt with when it hadn't.

Mike Ritcey and a fellow member of Kamloops Search and Rescue received a call from a woman who spotted the deer on Tunkwa Lake, about 80 kilometres west of Kamloops.
Mike Ritcey and a fellow member of Kamloops Search and Rescue received a call from a woman who spotted the deer on Tunkwa Lake, about 80 kilometres west of Kamloops.
Image Credit: FACEBOOK

Spokesperson Tobe Sprado says it's not unusual for deer to flee to frozen lakes while being chased by predators and then be unable to get up from the ice.

"For whatever reason, they look at the lake as being a bit of a refuge," he says. "We get calls every year about stranded deer in ice."

He says conservation offers do not typically rescue deer in such situations.

"It's a risky situation, to be putting your life at risk for saving a deer," he says.

"We usually let nature run its course in a lot of these incidents. The other option, if we feel its in public interest and to prevent suffering of the animal, we would possibly attend and euthanize that wildlife."

Another option the service would "possibly consider" would be to reach out to other entities, such as search and rescue or municipal fire departments, who would have the equipment and training to save the deer, he said.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2017
The Canadian Press

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