Canada loses battle with U.S. government over meat labelling - InfoNews

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Canada loses battle with U.S. government over meat labelling

January 27, 2014 - 6:01 PM

OTTAWA - Canada has lost its battle with the U.S. government over meat labelling.

American lawmakers have refused to make changes to country-of-origin labelling that had been sought by the Canadian government and beef and pork producers.

Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and International Trade Minister Ed Fast say they're disappointed, adding Canada may retaliate by imposing tariffs on a wide range of American products.

Country-of-origin labelling rules are blamed for complicating the import of meat and livestock into the U.S. from Canada and for reducing the amount of Canadian exports to the country by half since 2008.

The rules require detailed labels about the origins of beef, pork and chicken sold in U.S. stores.

That drives up the price tag of Canadian exports and undermines their competitiveness, causing about $1 billion a year in losses.

"By refusing to fix country-of-origin labelling, the U.S. is effectively legislating its own citizens out of work, and harming Canadian and American livestock producers alike by disrupting the highly-integrated North American meat industry supply chain," the ministers said in a statement.

"Our position remains that the changes made by the United States administration to mandatory COOL (will) increase discrimination against North American producers and processors, hurting hard-working Canadians and Americans alike.

"Our government continues to stand with our industry, and we remain steadfast in taking whatever steps may be necessary, including retaliation, to achieve a fair resolution."

Not long ago, Ritz had signalled some optimism on the topic, saying the chairman of a U.S. congressional committee had requested that his Department of Agriculture back off on the labelling rules.

But the U.S. decision — part of a massive federal farm bill to be voted on Wednesday — crushed Canadian hopes.

Ritz has said Ottawa will continue fighting the regulation at the World Trade Organization and cattlemen on both sides of the border will go on with their own court action.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2014
The Canadian Press

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