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Four stories in the news for today, Oct. 31

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rises during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing increased public pressure from Indigenous women and a feminist alliance to accept a Senate amendment of legislation on sex-based discrimination under the Indian Act. Advocates have joined forces with two Aboriginal senators -- Lillian Dyck and Sandra Lovelace-Nicholas -- in an awareness campaign that kicked off this week urging the Liberal government to change the bill known as S-3. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
October 31, 2017 - 1:15 AM

Four stories in the news for Tuesday, Oct. 31

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FEDS URGED TO ACCEPT SENATE CHANGE TO SEX DISCRIMINATION BILL

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing increased public pressure from Indigenous women and a feminist alliance to accept a Senate amendment of legislation on sex-based discrimination under the Indian Act. Advocates have joined forces with two Aboriginal senators — Lillian Dyck and Sandra Lovelace-Nicholas — in an awareness campaign that kicked off this week urging the Liberal government to change the bill known as S-3. Part of the outreach includes the distribution of a letter to women's organizations, academics and human rights groups to canvass support on the "full and final removal" of sex discrimination in the Indian Act.

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CANADA'S SCREEN INDUSTRY TO MEET ABOUT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

Canadian film and TV leaders are acknowledging that sexual harassment has also been a "prevalent" part of the entertainment industry north of the border and have planned a meeting to discuss how to tackle it. In the wake of the flood of allegations against fallen Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, writer-director James Toback and others, the union representing Canadian actors, ACTRA, has had preliminary meetings with industry groups and is preparing for a broader meeting of stakeholders on Nov. 23 in Toronto.

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'MADAMA BUTTERFLY' PRODUCTION SPARKS DISCUSSION

An upcoming Manitoba Opera production of "Madama Butterfly" has sparked debate over how the tragic tale fits with modern views about race. The story centres around a young Japanese geisha who marries an American naval officer, only to be betrayed shortly after they wed. Jenny Heijun Wills, who directs the University of Manitoba's Critical Race network, says the opera reinforces harmful stereotypes about Asian women.

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FOOD BANK, CLINICS CATER TO PETS IN NEED

From free food to health care, various groups are providing resources to make life easier for homeless and low-income people with pets in British Columbia. Kim Monteith with the SPCA says there are many misconceptions about vulnerable people with animals, including an assumption that people on the street only have animals to get sympathy or more money from panhandling. But Monteith says pets bring unconditional love and companionship to people who otherwise may not have those ties.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2017
The Canadian Press

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