In the news today, May 6 | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

Current Conditions

Mostly Cloudy
5.9°C

In the news today, May 6

The first rendering from hemp plants extracted from a super critical CO2 extraction device on its' way to becoming fully refined CBD oil spurts into a large beaker at New Earth Biosciences in Salem, Ore., on April 24, 2018. Retailers across Canada are struggling with a shortage of all cannabis, but there's one product they're especially desperate to keep on shelves: cannabidiol or CBD, a non-intoxicating extract vaunted for its purported health benefits. The extract, most commonly sold as oil, has been promoted as a natural cure for pain, anxiety and insomnia, despite limited medical research. Many customers are coming in asking for it, especially first-time and older users, store owners say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Don Ryan
May 06, 2019 - 5:10 AM

Three stories in the news for Monday, May 6

———

FEDERAL BYELECTION DAY NANAIMO, B.C.

Voters are heading to the polls today to elect a member of Parliament in the B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith in what could be an indicator of the fall federal election. The leaders of the Liberals, Conservatives, Greens, NDP and the People's Party of Canada have all visited the riding since the byelection was called. David Black, a political communications expert at Royal Roads University in Victoria, says that highlights the importance of today's. He says the parties will use the byelection as a study for political messaging before the Oct. 21 federal election.

———

SHORTAGE OF POPULAR CANNABIS PRODUCT IN CANADA

Retailers across Canada are struggling with a shortage of all cannabis, but there's one product they're especially desperate to keep on shelves: CBD. It's a non-intoxicating extract that has been promoted as a natural cure for pain, anxiety and insomnia, despite limited medical research. It's so trendy that Kim Kardashian West recently posted on Instagram about her "CBD baby shower," where she invited guests to make CBD-infused salt scrubs and body oil. Companies are ramping up hemp growth to produce the popular extract, but observers expect the shortage to persist until late this year.

———

DOCTORS CALL FOR CHANGE TO ADDRESS SUICIDE

Two doctors are drawing attention to the issue of suicide in their profession, which they say needs to be addressed through systemic change because burnout that starts in medical school is literally killing physicians. Sarah Tulk, a family physician in Milton, Ontario, and Joy Albuquerque, medical director of the Ontario Medical Association's physician health program, say suicide is an occupational hazard for doctors. The pair say in today's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal that the rate of suicide for male doctors is nearly double that of the general public, while it's two and a half times higher for females.

———

ALSO IN THE NEWS:

— Environment Minister Catherine McKenna addresses the media following a meeting of G7 environment ministers in France.

— Bausch Health, Air Canada and Cargojet review Q1 earnings.

— Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos makes an announcement about the Canada Child Benefit.

— Court appearance in Smithers, B.C. for Luke Strimbold, former Burns Lake mayor facing multiple sex charges.

———

News from © The Canadian Press, 2019
The Canadian Press

  • Popular kelowna News
View Site in: Desktop | Mobile