In the news today, Jan. 29 - InfoNews

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In the news today, Jan. 29

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, right, arrives at a parole office with a member of her private security detail in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
January 29, 2019 - 5:02 AM

Seven stories in the news for Tuesday, Jan. 29

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CASE OF HUAWEI EXEC BACK IN VANCOUVER COURT

The case of a senior executive of Chinese tech juggernaut Huawei Technologies is scheduled to return to court in Vancouver today. The U.S. Department of Justice laid out its case Monday against China's Meng Wanzhou and Huawei, unsealing 13 criminal counts of conspiracy, fraud and obstruction. The indictment, based on 23 grand jury allegations, accuses Huawei and Meng of misrepresenting their ownership of a Hong Kong-based subsidiary between 2007 and 2017 in an effort to circumvent U.S. sanctions against Iran. The company's U.S. branch is also accused of stealing trade secrets and equipment from cellphone provider T-Mobile USA.

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DEVELOPMENT EXPECTED IN McARTHUR CASE

Police say a significant development is expected in court today in the case of an alleged serial killer accused of preying on men who disappeared from Toronto's gay village. Sixty-seven-year-old Bruce McArthur, 67, faces eight counts of first-degree murder related to men who vanished between 2010 and 2017. Toronto police notified the media about the development on Monday, but declined to comment further. The self-employed landscaper was arrested in January 2018 and eventually charged with eight counts of first-degree murder.

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SENTENCING CONTINUES FOR TRUCKER IN BRONCOS CRASH

Many more families of those who died and were injured in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash are expected to speak in court today. About half of 75 victim impact statements are still to be submitted in a sentencing hearing for the truck driver who blew a stop sign in rural Saskatchewan. Court heard Monday that the truck was covering all lanes of the intersection north of Tisdale, Sask., when the junior hockey team's bus struck it last April. Sixteen people died and 13 were injured. Jaskirat Singh Sidhu has pleaded guilty to 29 counts of dangerous driving.

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FEDS TO OFFER $114.7M FOR ASYLUM-SEEKER HOUSING

The federal government is planning to spend an additional $114.7 million to compensate provinces and municipalities for temporary housing costs for asylum seekers. The money is part of $2.5 billion in new spending plans tabled late Monday as part of the government's supplementary estimates. The financial document says the influx of irregular migrants entering Canada has increased pressure on provinces to provide shelter and social services. The $114.7 million in new funding will be used to compensate provinces and municipalities for temporary housing costs and to provide "federal interim lodging facilities" services to supplement the housing capacity that is currently available.

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FEDS SET TO DECIDE FATE OF BENEFITS TRIBUNAL

Federal cabinet ministers will soon decide whether and how to reform the tribunal Canadians use to appeal federal benefits rulings — potentially undoing changes made six years ago intended to make it work better. The Social Security Tribunal hears appeals of government decisions on things such as eligibility for Employment Insurance and the Canada Pension Plan. It replaced four separate bodies in 2013. A report last year from KPMG estimated the moves saved about $22.6 million a year. Timelines for decisions also spiked as the tribunal was undermanned and overwhelmed with cases. Labour and employer groups have each told the government they want a return to the system as it existed before the tribunal's creation.

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FUNDS BACK PALLIATIVE PARAMEDIC TRAINING

Health authorities across the country are getting funds to train thousands of paramedics to deliver palliative care. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement say they are jointly providing up to $5.5 million over the next four years for the plan in six provinces. They expect that will support training for more than 5,000 paramedics. The two agencies say palliative paramedic services can reduce unnecessary hospital visits and give those with cancer and other life-limiting conditions access to urgent end-of-life care "when they need it, and where they want it." The program is based on existing models in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Alberta.

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JUNO NOMINATIONS TO BE UNVEILED TODAY

Nominees for the 2019 Juno Awards will be revealed this morning with superstars such as Drake and Shawn Mendes expected to be in the running. Other contenders likely to grab nods at Canada's biggest music night could include rock favourites Arkells, rising Indigenous singer Jeremy Dutcher and acclaimed songstress Charlotte Day Wilson. Organizers are also expected to shed some light on plans for hosting duties at this year's broadcast in London, Ont. The Juno Awards will air live March 17 on CBC-TV.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS:

— Northern Pulp is seeking permanent injunction against fishermen protesting seismic survey work in the Northumberland Strait.

— The murder trial continues today for Dennis Oland, who is accused of killing his father, Richard.

— Special prosecutor Chris Considine appears in the case of two Mounties who face charges surrounding the investigation into the deaths of six people in Surrey in 2007.

— CN Rail will release its fourth-quarter results after markets close today.

News from © The Canadian Press, 2019
The Canadian Press

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