Four stories in the news today, Dec. 19 | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source

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Four stories in the news today, Dec. 19

Calgary Police Service chief Roger Chaffin speaks during an interview with the Canadian Press in Calgary, Alta., Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
December 19, 2016 - 12:12 AM

Four stories in the news for Monday, Dec. 19

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FEDS AND PROVINCES DICKER OVER HEALTH CARE FUNDING

Canada's finance and health ministers meet today to try to reach an agreement on federal funding for health care, but the tone heading into the meetings is tense. Provincial ministers said Sunday night that they were insulted by what they called a lacklustre, take-it-or-leave-it offer from the Trudeau government. Ottawa has been adamant that it wants to reduce the yearly increase in federal funding for health care that provinces have recently enjoyed.

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MILITARY FINDS MORE QUESTIONABLE DRESS CODE PAMPHLETS

A Canadian Forces probe of cadet dress-code pamphlets has uncovered eight containing "unacceptable language." The discovery comes months after controversy over a similar recruitment leaflet that the defence minister said "shamed" young women. That pamphlet referred to the four Bs — "boobs, belly, bums, boxers." It was condemned by Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan in September.

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CALGARY'S TOP COP WORRIED ABOUT PEOPLE SHOT BY OFFICERS

Calgary's police chief is concerned there were 10 police involved shootings in his city this year, and he's determined to find out why. Roger Chaffin wants an independent probe to determine what's gone wrong. He says it's not something he would put on the officers, but he hopes he can take action to reduce police shootings in his city.

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SAVING KILLER WHALES FROM NOISY SHIPS

The federal government is looking for a way to regulate underwater shipping noise to help protect endangered killer whales from increased oil tanker traffic off Vancouver. Environmental groups are currently poised to file a lawsuit challenging the approval of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, alleging the government failed to mitigate the project's impact on resident killer whales. Shipping noise interferes with the ability of killer whales to track prey and communicate with one another in the hunt, and is considered a key stressor on the population.

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News from © The Canadian Press, 2016
The Canadian Press

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