Facebook's limits on using data brokers won't stop tracking

The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square, Thursday, March 29, 2018. Facebook’s decision to stop working with third-party data collectors might earn it public-relations points, but it does little to protect your privacy. The social network still has more than enough data on your interests and hobbies to target ads with precision. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

NEW YORK - Facebook's decision to stop working with third-party data collectors might earn it public-relations points, but it does little to protect your privacy.

It still has more than enough data on your interests and hobbies to target ads.

The company will still tap browser and device IDs to track visits to third-party sites and apps. And it will still have plenty from your use of its service — everything from the businesses and hobbies you "like" to the types of news articles you read and share.

Experts say Facebook can try to diffuse the criticism by saying it's backing off on some data. But in reality, it doesn't really need that data anymore. It might have been useful early on, but Facebook already has much of the data in-house.


jonesie
JONESIE: You're barking up the wrong end of the pipeline
OPINION When I was a kid growing up, it seemed like the concept of litter wasn’t fully understood. We’d hit the Tas-T-Mill for a pizza pop or the Five & Dime for snacks and it wasn’t even a consideration to b

Top News