Dior's cats and dogs: Kim Jones unleashes a star-studded, art-inspired Paris collection | iNFOnews | Thompson-Okanagan's News Source
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Dior's cats and dogs: Kim Jones unleashes a star-studded, art-inspired Paris collection

A model wears a creation for the Dior Spring Summer 2025 collection presented Friday, June 21, 2024 in Paris. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)
Original Publication Date June 21, 2024 - 9:41 AM

PARIS (AP) — Kim Jones ’ starry collection for Dior was the fruit of an encounter with ceramicist Hylton Nel, whose pottery and ceramics, including animal motifs, gave the spring collection for the Parisian powerhouse a fun, arty—and domesticated lift.

Here are some highlights of Friday’s spring 2025 menswear collections:

It's raining cats and dogs – chic ones

On a drizzly day, Demi Moore swept in with her plus one — a Chihuahua called Pilaf— and when asked if she preferred dogs or cats, she replied, “isn’t it obvious?” In the same spirit as the Hollywood actress, Dior’s runway decor, inside the opulent grounds of the Left Bank’s grand 17th century Val-de-Grace, was very tongue-in-cheek. It consisted of sculptures depicting ceramic reclining nude felines and cheeky canines, inspired by Nel and the Dior designer’s own collection of trinkets.

Jones’ artistic references are no surprise. Known for his historical and cultural inspirations, he has previously drawn on his uncle’s photographs of Rudolf Nureyev and T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land.” This collection continued his tradition, bringing Nel’s whimsical ceramics to life.

Bird motifs on a moody, black tailored jacket and a gender-fluid cloche hat opened the show, the model holding a reclining nude feline. Sketch-like animal motifs then appeared throughout. Loose, boxy proportions on car coats and skorts felt airy and defined the spring silhouette of designs that channeled the muted pastels of glazed ceramics. A demure pearly neck accessory — a sort of strappy hood collar — was a standout that seemed at once historic and fashion-forward, a signature of the British designer.

Jones’ innovative tailoring shone through, as always. Spring-like coats that seemed soft and feminine were given a full stop in the form of black leather boots, in one of many plays of contrast. This juxtaposition of delicate and strong elements is a hallmark of Jones’ design. This season however, seemed more like a variation on a theme for the couturier, rather than something overtly new.

Yet the celebrity front row, as ever — including Moore, Robert Pattinson, Kate Moss, Pharrell Williams, as well as Taehyun, Soobin, Huening Kai and Yeonjun of Tomorrow X Together — brought a special kind of energy.

Junya's punk-like red carpet

An urban patchwork suit in black, with frayed edges but a crisp silhouette, opened Junya Watanabe’s latest menswear show, setting the stage for a focused and daring theme. The Japanese designer, known for his avant-garde creations and distinctive aesthetic, once again pushed the boundaries.

Bow ties poked out above red carpet-ready white tuxedo shirts on a literal red carpet runway. But this was no ordinary Awards Ceremony outfit — an earring here, a frayed hem there. This was the punk answer to red carpet season. Tuxedo pants suddenly became distressed black jeans. Electrified hair standing on end, paired with snipped-away patches of tartan and slashed inserts, evoked a Tim Burton’s Edward Scissorhands vibe.

Watanabe, celebrated for his progressive tailoring and deconstruction, continued to showcase his blending of historical references with modern subcultures.

The collection also reflected Watanabe’s penchant for collaboration, with elements reminiscent of his partnerships with brands like Levi’s and Carhartt. The fusion of high fashion with utilitarian elements added depth to the pieces, making them strikingly theatrical. Ready for the spotlight.

Mayner delivers oversized, Asian-themed elegance

Loose proportions and a round-shouldered coat paired with strappy box sandals gave the start of Hed Mayner’s spring collection a hint of the Far East. The show reflected Israeli designer Mayner’s unique ability to find freedom within constraint. Cross-over silhouettes in silky linen tops and jackets, alongside Samurai-like utilitarian details on belt fastenings and waist straps, completed the Asiatic theme. Broad, boxy, and oversized was the overarching aesthetic in a strikingly voluminous display.

Mayner is known for his conceptual approach to shape. Oversized gloves and sanitized, protruding box-like white pockets, resembling fencing garb, added an aggressive edge as the collection.

Mayner’s designs often deconstruct classic garments and balance tradition with modernity. The Samurai-like details and utilitarian elements echoed his knack for reinterpretation. The cross-over silhouettes and belt fastenings were reminiscent of historical attire, yet firmly planted in the contemporary.

Silky linens and other natural fibers were manipulated to create structured yet fluid shapes. The oversized gloves, which could have been used to handle toxic chemicals, added a utilitarian aspect to the show.

News from © The Associated Press, 2024
The Associated Press

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