World is watching: commissioner of missing, murdered indigenous women inquiry

Marion Buller, Chief commissioner for national public inquiry into missing and murdered women, is pictured during an interview with The Canadian Press in Ottawa on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. The chief commissioner for the inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women says she knows the "world is watching" as her team works to launch hearings on the issue -- and she wants to assure Canadians a lot is happening behind the scenes.Marion Buller says the way the inquiry was announced this summer led people to mistakenly believe sessions would start immediately.
Image Credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

OTTAWA - The chief commissioner for the inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women says she knows the "world is watching" as her team works to launch hearings on the issue — and she wants to assure Canadians a lot is happening behind the scenes.

Marion Buller says the way the inquiry was announced this summer led people to mistakenly believe sessions would start immediately.

She says she and the four other commissioners are working diligently to hire staff and open the inquiry headquarters in Vancouver next week.

Buller also wants to assure families that her team is carefully designing a process that meets the goal of doing "no harm."

The chief commissioner notes families will be given options on how to participate in the inquiry process, including the chance to speak publicly at community gatherings or in private sessions.

Buller says Michele Moreau — executive director of the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice — will serve as the executive director for the inquiry.


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