VIDEO: Watch how crews relocated two Osprey nests in Salmon Arm

A B.C. Hydro technician prepares to remove Osprey eggs before the nest is moved to a nearby platform.
Image Credit: B.C. Hydro

SALMON ARM - It was no average day on the job for B.C. Hydro crews as they carefully relocated a pair of osprey nests in the Shuswap last week.

The two large, 40-kilogram nests were located atop power poles and had caused three outages affecting thousands of customers in Salmon Arm.

Ospreys are a protected species in B.C. and often build bulky stick nests on top of trees or other tall structures, like power poles.

“However, the poles are not safe for the birds since they have live power lines attached to them. In addition, the nests create a hazard for B.C. Hydro's power line technicians who are required to work on the lines,” states a release from B.C. Hydro.

Crews usually prefer to relocate nests in the fall and winter months when they are unoccupied, but because these nests were close to high voltage lines, crews moved them last Friday, June 3.

The nests were picked up by technicians and moved to two newly built nesting platforms nearby.


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