Program moves Penticton First Nations students closer to employment goals

Image Credit: shutterstock.com

PENTICTON - Ten Aboriginal learners in the Okanagan region are on the path to becoming early childhood educators thanks to a community- based education and training partnership with the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology.

The Ooknakane Friendship Centre and En'owkin Centre in Penticton are partnering with the institute on the program, which is receiving funding in the amount of $101,302. The program consists of accredited early childhood education courses that will provide participants with the skills and education to enter into early childhood educator positions.

This program is one of five new partnerships worth a total of $1 million that are enabling Aboriginal people to get skills and education in their communities to prepare for jobs in B.C.'s growing economy.

The other communities and organizations that will benefit from the partnership program with public post-secondary institutions are Lhtako Dene Nation, Squamish Nation, Xeni Gwet'in First Nations and Osoyoos Indian Band.

This $1 million investment is in addition to the $6.4 million in joint federal and provincial government funding previously announced for 23 projects to create partnerships between public post-secondary institutions and local Aboriginal communities. These projects are expected to deliver education and training that ranges from academic upgrading to skilled qualifications to more than 440 Aboriginal people. Today's announcement builds on that investment, and will provide training for a further 105 participants in five communities.


becky-mann
MANN: Should our children be online before they even know what online means?
OPINION Up until this week I had never heard of sharenting — it’s a new word for my repertoire, but one I think I will be hearing more of. Sharenting is when parents share too much about their child/children on s

Top News