Kamloops university campus step closer to becoming 'university village'

Thompson Rivers University

KAMLOOPS - Thompson Rivers University is looking to developers to help create an urban atmosphere and more vibrant neighbourhood at the campus.

With the green light given on the necessary zoning amendments this week, the university has new opportunities for developments on the Sahali campus and university president Alan Shaver says the hope is to have shovels in the ground starting sometime in 2017, though he’s not certain what.

“We decided a long time ago we’re not going to tell developers what to do,” he says. “We’re going to be asking them what they’re proposing to do. (But) they don’t get to dictate to the university what happens, the university has the final sign off.”

Shaver says there could be a variety of projects built, but there are no specific plans in place just yet. Broadly, the university is interested in building a neighbourhood which could include up to 3,500 residences, accommodating a population up to 5,000, over the next 30 to 40 years, he says.

The rezoning allows for commercial space as well and Thompson Rivers University Community Trust director Frank Quinn told council this week plans may include businesses like a grocery store or hotel. Shaver added the land will be leased long-term, and not sold.

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