A part of the Films for Change series


2015 is the International Year of Soils as declared by the United Nations. We need soils to produce food, give clothes and build homes. Soils also store and filter water, recycle nutrients, and create a barrier against floods.

Symphony of the Soil is a 104-minute documentary feature film that explores the complexity and mystery of soil. Filmed on four continents and sharing the voices of some of the world’s most esteemed soil scientists, farmers and activists, the film portrays soil as a protagonist of our planetary story.

Using a captivating mix of art and science , the film shows that soil is a complex living organism, the foundation of life on earth.

Yet most people are soil-blind and “treat soil like dirt.” Through the knowledge and wisdom revealed in this film, we can come to respect, even revere, this miraculous substance, and appreciate that treating the soil right can help solve some of our most pressing environmental problems Symphony of the Soil was an official part of the United Nations Celebrations for the International Year of the Soil at the United Nations in New York and in Rome, Italy.

- Winner of the Life Sciences Film Festival, Prague 2012.

- Merit Award for Scientific Information from the Montana CINE International Film Festival, September 2012.

- Deborah Koons Garcia received the John de Graaf Environmental Filmmaking Award for her body of films on agriculture, genetically modified food and sustainability at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival January 2013.

- Winner of the 2013 Cinema Verde Film Festival’s Food Award.

Screening of Sympony of the Soil: April 29 at TRU Alumni Theatre (Clocktower.)

Sponsored by TRU’s Office of Environment and Sustainability and presented by Kamloops Food Policy Council.

Reports came in to the RAPP hotline of this buck that was trapped in a volleyball net.
Why our cities and towns are hazardous to deer
KELOWNA - Over the weekend, Conservation Officers rescued a large buck that was became ensnared in a volleyball net. While the image may seem strange, Ken Owens, Conservation Officer in the North Okanagan says it's actually quite commo

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